Wednesday, 28 March 2018

The Fruits of his Labour.


                                 

One or two readers may remember this row of exceptional Soft Fruit bushes that a 'neighbour' was growing on the edge of his borrowed veg' patch. They were all very fancy new hybrid varieties, and the fruits were amazing.

The man in question was later 'rather rude' (appallingly so) to the person who had kindly allowed him the FREE use of her land, and he has now departed; tail between legs. A very stupid man indeed; good riddance.

He had all sorts of hardy-perrenial plants on his plot. There were fancy varieties of Blackberries and Raspberries (above), as well as Rhubarb, Strawberries, and an ornamental crab apple tree. Before quitting his plot for the final time, he stripped everything of interest and gave them to another neighbour.

I was hoping to have rescued a few plants following his departure; but to no avail. He left nothing behind.


However, I walk past the spot where they were growing on most mornings, and I noticed that a few remaining stems, in amongst all the detritus, had started to sprout leaves. Of course there's no way of knowing what varieties they are, but I've pulled a few, and now await to see what's what. Seeing as they were all very special varieties, I'm sure there'll be something amongst them worth keeping.

One is always happy to see the back of uncouth neighbours. His unpleasant memory will live on in the soft fruits that I hope we shall harvest in the future; we may even drink a toast to his very welcomed departure, as we eat our winter Blackberry, or Raspberry and Apple Crumbles.



31 comments:

  1. I remember you writing about this. I am so happy you have rescued a soft fruit stem to grow and be happy.

    cheers, parsnip

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've saved about 6 in all, and I notice that there are still more. My 6 are enough.

      Delete
  2. I also remember you mentioning this neighbour. Hope you're luckier with these shoots than the chestnuts.
    Greetings Maria x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They seem very healthy, and the rain that we're having will help.

      Delete
  3. I'm sure your treasures will grow, you're a good gardener. Nice of him to leave these behind.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think if he'd known they were there, he'd have taken them out as well.

      Delete
    2. Nasty person... I hate bitter people.

      Jo in Auckland, NZ

      Delete
  4. You’re a right old forager Cro 🤣. !!! It will be so interesting to see what comes of them ... keep us informed of their progress. XXXX

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will indeed; no-one is more interested than moi.

      Delete
  5. Will you keep your new fruit finds in plant pots or will you plant them out?

    I am always dividing perennials and making cuttings in my polytunnel. Especially when it's raining. Good luck with the fruit bushes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They're all planted outside; wherever I could find a space. They seem to do well here wherever they are.

      Delete
  6. Well done on keeping your eyes peeled. Raspberry shoots often come up a long way from the parent plant and this is the perfect time to transplant. I planted eight new raspberry canes at the allotment last year and will be digging up a couple to take to my new garden.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My Tayberries send up shoots all over the place, which is how I originally obtained them.... They crept through from my neighbour's garden.

      Delete
  7. You are very lucky to see the back of him, our horrendous neighbour still lives next door, she is (as they all are) a complete law to herself, enjoy your peace.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't personally come up against his bile, but several did.

      Delete
  8. You seem to get quite a few oddballs in your little hamlet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was he who sold his house to Mr Shipping-Container. He then borrowed some land so that he could continue to grow his vegs. He should have been grateful to his benefactor; they'd been neighbours for yonks. It takes all sorts.

      Delete
    2. His passing shot, the container man.

      Delete
  9. Some people have very nasty maggots festering inside.

    ReplyDelete
  10. looks like rasberry to me. Glad you've rescued them

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They were mostly Raspberries, all different colours and sizes.

      Delete
  11. Hope that you do get fruit from the shoots - it will taste better when you've rescued them!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sure that rescued fruit tastes the best; it won't take too long to see.

      Delete
  12. They should do fine, that one has plenty of root mass. We can’t plant enough, with five grandchildren we never see ripe fruit for the table.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Usually you can just throw a cutting on the ground, and they'll grow. Most of the one's I've pulled have some root on, so they should all be OK.

      Delete
  13. It's quite exciting not knowing exactly what's coming.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly. It'll be fun seeing what grows.

      Delete

  14. I remember you writing about this. I am so happy you have rescued a soft fruit stem to grow and be happy.

    หนังออนไลน์

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...