Wednesday, 9 May 2018

3 Tie knots, and what they tell you about the wearer!



Above is the standard 'gentleman's' knot; simple, nothing fancy, learnt at Nanny's knee. This would be spotted at Boodle's, the Member's stand at Lords, and at Smith's Lawn. 


This knot is more triangular, and is called the 'Windsor' knot. Favoured by young men who consider themselves stylish and cool; it will be seen on junior bank clerks, aspiring estate agents, and others of that ilk (often worn with 'swept away' collars).


And thirdly, this rather unpleasant FAT knot fashioned at the very end of the tie (often much lower than above) is exclusively used by 14 year old rebellious schoolboys, or (if the tie is white) by Bridegrooms at their charming Chavdom weddings.

There are, of course, other knots, but it's worth knowing what secrets these three particularly common ones are telling you about their wearer.

Happy knot-spotting.



37 comments:

  1. What about wearers of black tee shirts therefore no tie?

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    Replies
    1. They don't come under the category of Tie wearers.

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  2. Don't see a lot of ties around here.

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    Replies
    1. There are a few in my cupboard; one of which is illustrated.

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  3. Ties are 'out' here too. Our PM refuses to wear one, ever.
    I did know how to tie a knot when I went to High School but ties on elastic soon came in. It would be like a Chinese puzzle now.
    Hubby lives wearing a tie. More the first knot than the second.
    Interesting.

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    1. I can't remember when I last wore a tie, but the knot was also always No 1.

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  4. This entire post would be Double Dutch to my dear old farmer - a knot was a knot was a knot - and ties up here are only worn at funerals and in front of a class of pupils at some of the 'better' schoos.

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    1. I only keep a few ties these days; my old school one, and a few navy with spots from my city days. They are never worn.

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  5. I always tie a Half-Windsor, not to be mistaken for a Windsor. It's practical, easily adjustable and looks neat if you tie it properly. My number one rule is NEVER wear striped ties, and I haven't done since I left school.

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    1. I had to stand in front of a mirror and think twice as I tied the above. When younger, one did it with eyes closed; I'm out of practice.

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  6. My husband wears ties to work and he makes, what they call here, the double knot and I think it is what you call the Windsor knot but he does not wear it thin and tight like in the second picture
    I also noticed that I have started to take his ties to the drycleaners more often lately to get stains removed!
    Greetings Maria x

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    1. I think I would be inclined to buy a new tie, if my lunch ended-up all over it. Either that or boil it for soup.

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    2. It is specialised in drycleaning ties; they get back looking like new. It is expensive but, not like buying a new tie x

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    3. Maybe, but just think of that soup.

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  7. My brother wears a tie everyday and probably has done so since he was about 5 when he started school.

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    Replies
    1. I think Rees-Mogg is the same. I did know a Brit out here who always wore a suit and tie; even in the height of Summer. He eventually died of it, aged about 90.

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  8. I think I've forgotten how to tie a Windsor Knot, which seems like a good thing by your account.

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    Replies
    1. I had to think twice about how to do it. No 1 came easily enough.

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  9. My fashion statement when wearing a tie in the WRAF was using a black braid - like girls used to wear with gymslips. I guess I thought it looked smarter than the nasty nylon things that were issued.
    Is Tie Rack still going in the UK?

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    Replies
    1. Tie Rack? No idea! I haven't set foot in Blighty for years!

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    2. Yes. It's gone as Rachel said. I never bought a tie there but they were an excellent source of silk handkerchiefs.

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    3. I remember buying some wonderful 'Snuff handkerchiefs' there; not that I take Snuff.

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  10. The Windsor Knot is worn with the rest of the tie flung over the right shoulder to denote a sense of action and urgency.

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    Replies
    1. Quite right; a style that could never be adopted with my No 3 illustration.

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  11. I'm glad to say that I've always used the first knot.

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    Replies
    1. I've just been watching PMQ's, and it seems to be the most popular (on one side at least).

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  12. Replies
    1. Not even to hold-up your Cricket whites?

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  13. I am relieved I don't have to wear a tie.

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  14. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. Marion, there are only two types of Bow Ties; the ones you tie yourself, and ready tied. Need I tell you which is acceptable, and which is not?

      At this time of year I rarely wear socks, I find it 'liberating'.

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    2. A gentleman always ties his own!

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  15. We wear a lot of Bolo Ties out here in the west. Cord or leather with some sort of metal clip instead of a knot. This look is so nine with a suit to jeans and a jacket.
    Women wear them also. I had several with inlaid turquoise.

    cheers, parsnip

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    Replies
    1. I had never heard them called 'Bolo Ties'. In the UK they are referred to as 'Bootlace Ties'.

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