Friday, 15 June 2018

Harvesting.



It is often said (by gardeners who know what they're talking about) that one should begin harvesting your veg' as soon as it becomes edible.

I tend to ignore this advice, as I like to see things grow to a reasonable size before tucking-in. 

My last year's Red Onion crop is a good example. I hardly touched a single Onion before they were fully grown and harvested, then at the end of this last Winter I threw away several kilos that had gone bad.

This year I plan to take the advice, and have already started to harvest Onions, Courgettes, and Spinach, all of which would normally be regarded as far too young to eat. 

In about a week's time I will also have Caulis, Cabbages, and Broccoli, all of which will look as if they've come direct from the 'Mini Veg' department at Waitrose; but without the air-miles. Trendy, or what!



39 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I think one of the main advantages of growing your own vegies is being able to have them young.

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    2. It's also very tempting to grow the BIGGEST of everything.

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  2. Tender, young, fresh veggies are a gourmet delight. Lucky Cro.

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    1. We'll soon be inundated; it happens every year.

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  3. Sounds like good advice. I am anticipating a good tomato year.

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    1. Me too Doc, as long as all the diseases hold off. I only have 9 plants, but they're all looking good.

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  4. Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow
    Greetings Maria x

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  5. I get told off by the gardener for picking stuff too young. That reminds me, I must go and check the beetroots today..

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    1. I'm just back from the woods; there are Girolles everywhere. I'm told the same is for Cepes, but I didn't find any.

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  6. That is a great harvest. It seems strange to me, the caulis and onions which are winter vegetables here.
    Eating young and tender sounds the way to go.
    We are getting loads of green peppers. Some of the tomatoes are really tasty, others have rotten bottoms. After a Google it looks as though they have something, I think, called blossom bottom and need calcium. All those eggs shells haven't help. I'll be going to the gardening shop today

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    1. I've had that rotting here too. Luckily not recently, so my fingers are crossed.

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  7. Since we all tend to grow too much for personal consumption, and it's often all ready at once, this seems sensible?

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    Replies
    1. I always grow too much; even with my small plot.

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  8. I suppose a lot depends on your crop planting regime and how many of something you plant. Many things taste so much better nice and young. I used to try and plant my crops with periods in between but it never seemed to work out.

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    1. I sow my French beans at 3 weekly intervals, it seems to work quite well.

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  9. Aim to end up with enough to store...sow too many to start with and eat the thinnings...sounds ok!

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    Replies
    1. I usually do a lot of conserves, so it's a matter of balance.

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  10. A great harvest you have, every time i tell myself i must start growing my own vegetables here.

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    1. It's just starting. Mid-June is usually when we begin being self-sufficient.

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  11. Interesting article,about Bolivian farmers growing underground to beat the weather. On BBC business news.Think I may adapt it for here in Wales.

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    1. In Wales a good sized Polytunnel would be useful.

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  12. Do you think it is much cheaper than buying your vegetables, perhaps not at Waitrose though. My efforts have always cost a bomb.

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    1. I don't really think in terms of economics. I like to have my crops handy, and I like to know what they've been grown with (or without).

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    2. Andrew, forget cost (not least in labour - pleasurable as it is); in terms of nutrition - from soil to plate in zero time and no nutrients lost - Cro has it made.

      Green (envying Cro) greetings,
      U

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  13. Your garden is the best definition of eating local. My garden is no where that stage. I am hopeful although the chipmunks are having a riot in the green beans.

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    Replies
    1. My first green beans are just coming into flower. We should have some in a week or so.

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  14. They are eating the flowers. It's a new challenge for me.

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  15. I would call it sensible for several reasons Cro - firstly when the new veg come in they are at their most expensive so that is the best time to eat your own, secondly they do without a doubt taste better when young, and thirdly some veg in some winters do not keep well. The farmer was always keen to keep veg until they reached what he thought of as 'proper' size - it took me years to get him to eat baby broad beans - then he couldn't get enough of them!

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    Replies
    1. I'm sure you're right. I'm certainly much more keen to get eating than I used to be. I've seen the light.

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  16. I read 'air miles' as 'air mites'. Couldn't wait to look up that one.

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    1. 'Air-Miles' are one of the world's problems. I live in a very rural area, where there are two basic crops; Maize and Sunflowers. A bit of Asparagus is grown, but it's not really sustenance food. Most of the supermarket food is imported, whereas fields either lie empty or have horses. It really doesn't make sense.

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  17. Since I do not have a garden and do not know when veg is ready to eat, I love the idea of picking as much as you need for lunch or dinner.

    cheers, parsnip

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    Replies
    1. From now until about October, that's exactly what we do.

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