Wednesday, 15 July 2015

The Long and the Short of Prongs.



Wills thinks that the prongs on our 'daily usage' forks (above) are too long. I have no idea how he came across this interesting observation, but he was most adamant.

I suggested that there was not (as yet) a European standard length for fork prongs, and maybe he could do some research into the subject. Maybe if he came to some firm conclusions he could then submit his findings to the 'European Fork Prong Length Politburo', and they would look into the matter.

In the meanwhile I did offer to cut down a fork for him, but he's still undecided as to the perfect length. Maybe I should make several all of differing lengths, and he could make his own choice.

Personally I've always rather liked 3 pronged forks; but that's a whole other can of worms.



47 comments:

  1. I agree with Wills. I like a nice short pronged, smallish fork. I have one odd long pronged fork in the cutlery drawer and if that comes out I have to stop eating and change it. I try to bury it but it keeps coming back to the surface. it looks very like your fork in the picture.

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    Replies
    1. There's more to this story than one imagines.

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    2. Am I supposed to read between the tines?

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    3. Great 2nd comment Rachel, so early in the morning too!

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    4. I'm all about Frances.

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  2. Three pronged forks? How savage! Evidently a follower of Lucifer! ;-)

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  3. That's a new thing to think about.

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  4. http://www.etiquettescholar.com/dining_etiquette/table_setting/place_setting/flatware/forks.html

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    1. The fork in question (above) is exactly 8 inches long; so the right length for Lobster, but not the right format.

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  5. I think your fork looks longer because it is narrow - I like a nice fat fork myself.

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  6. Yes agree - a sure sign that there's not much else going on ! Has Wills nothing more profound to contemplate !!

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    Replies
    1. It's the minutiae of life that's important.

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  7. Give him a child's fork, much shorter, but then he would start contemplating other things, heck no leave him with the fork, at least it's simple.

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  8. Mmmmmm …… interesting.Table etiquette says that a fork should be 7 inches long but it doesn't say how long your prongs should be !!!! It must be a personal thing.
    ….. and, could you answer me this ? When in France we have noticed that some restaurants present their fork prongs to the table …. I think it's something to do with not being menacing …. is it a French thing Cro ? XXXX

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    Replies
    1. It probably is a French thing. And around here, if you eat with farming families you are very rarely given a knife; they expect you to bring your own (like my Opinel above).

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    2. I like the idea of taking your own knife. I have a favourite glass that I would take with me. I think your fork is very elegant but can see that it might be a little long for a smaller person.
      Gill

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    3. it used to be the fork was turned over to show the family crest on the back. now it is probably to show a pattern on the rounded area.

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  9. It is a very elegant fork, but I agree that it looks a bit long in the prong for comfortable eating if one is used to a shorter weapon.

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  10. Who really cares about the shape and construction of the eating tools, it has to be about the food. I would gladly use a teaspoon if that was all there was, as long as you can get food to mouth it is fine.

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    Replies
    1. The wrong length prongs can make eating very uncomfortable. Perhaps the size of the mouth needs to be taken into account too.

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  11. Hahaha! Personally I can't bear a short prong. :)

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  12. I think that cutlers should be generous with prongs - always have a bit of prong in reserve. In another way, I am with you about how many. All you really need is two, to stop the bit of food from spinning around until it is upside-down. Even three is overdoing it, but four is just plain wasteful. The earliest forks were all two-pronged, but some bloody designer had to turn up and leave his mark on an everyday item which needed no improving. Also, the 18th century two-pronged forks were devilishly sharp. I have punctured my lips with them on many occasions. Forks these days are too blunt. We have lost the art of how to use them without personal injury unless they are deliberately blunted. It is the same with cut-throat razors. The safety razor was invented for use by men on train-jouries, and men who used them at home were considered cowards. I feel the same about blunt, four-pronged forks, which were - and still are - mainly used upside-down as pea-shovels by peasants who used to use butter-knives for the same purpose.

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    Replies
    1. I think I have exhausted myself with that to the point that I have no post of my own left in me now.

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    2. I always eat peas with honey
      I've done it all my life
      They do taste kinda funny
      but it sticks them to the knife.

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  13. You are all "Forking" mad. Fingers were invented first!

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    Replies
    1. No, teeth were invented before opposable thumbs.

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  14. I've just lost a follower. Now I know this posting is interesting!

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  15. I like a long pronged fork myself, greedily & most unladylike I can fit more food on!

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  16. Hi Cro; Using a short stubby fork make me feel I've been handed the children's safety cutlery by mistake. In fact, my daily usage forks look almost exactly like yours.

    My grownup stepson, a somewhat critical soul, also negatively commented on my lovely vintage and long pronged flatware at one time while visiting. I suggested he could use what's in front of him OR purchase me a new set to use only while he's visiting OR shut the hell up. He ate his dinner using my lovely long pronged forks. Problem solved. X

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    Replies
    1. Now, why didn't I think of that!

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    2. OMG ! Camille, I love your comment.

      cheers, parsnip

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  17. Hard to imagine, but I never thought about how long the prongs of a fork were. If it gets the food in my mouth, it is OK with me.

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  18. In the days when the farmer and I used to give large parties at Christmas, mid Summer and New Year's eve - I used to cook half a ham and a whole salmon. I never head enough cutlery of a good standard to go round. The three pronged so called steakforks were always the last to be picked up.

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  19. I have three sets of cutlery, some of the fork prongs are "European length", some are not as sharp, my favourite fork stays on top of the rest, more of a salad fork, I think I stole it from the Holiday Inn.
    ~Jo

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  20. Tell him to use a salad fork instead, that's what my husband does, he hates long prongs too.

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  21. Our table has long pronged forks, prongs down and knife blade facing in. Hmmmm I never gave this much thought.

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  22. To be or not to be that is the "prongs" !

    mia more a newcomer on your nice blog

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  23. Definitely a longer prong man myself. Particularly as one can 'hook' a greater number of spaghetti hoops on them.

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  24. Those prongs really are rather long!

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