Thursday, 13 August 2020

Plant rooting ball.



Most gardeners will have seen these black plastic rooting balls that seem to be suddenly very popular. As shown in the above illustration, you peel away a bit of 'bark' on the plant you wish to propagate, fill the plastic ball with compost, then wrap it around the peeled area.

Roots are supposed to form within two months.

Being an old skinflint, I thought I'd try to save myself a Euro or two, and I used one of Billy's old Tennis balls to do the same job. A small amount of cutting and trimming, and the ball was ready. I'm trying to propagate our beautiful red Oleander.


Unfortunately I shall have to wait until early October to see if it has worked. 

My fingers are crossed. I'll let you know!



25 comments:

  1. I haven't seen those special balls but can remember doing the aerial rooting with mother using moss and material tied around it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. These rooting balls just keep it all together and neat, but the principle is the same. I shall be interested to see if it works.

      Delete
  2. That looks interesting, I haven't seen this before. I wonder if Rick would miss any of his tennis balls...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He would happily sacrifice them in the name of horticulture; just ask Billy.

      Delete
  3. Once rooted, then what? Plant in a pot?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a spot by the pool, just waiting for an Oleander.

      Delete
  4. I have just used 2 of these little black balls, I am hopeless at propagating woody plants. Everything crossed for both of us, what are you going to call yours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought 'McEnroe' would be appropriate.

      Delete
  5. Or layer it along the ground with a metal peg. It works well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've used that method many times with Fig trees; they lend themselves to it.

      Delete
  6. I have never heard of this but if it works, that would be great. I am all about saving money but get even more excited about propagating new life for my gardens.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Let's hope that economy and horticulture will meet.

      Delete
  7. Looks far better than a plastic bag and tape!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I must say I haven't seen these Cro. Looks a good idea so shall be interested to see how things go with your economy version.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The way they are advertised, they look infallible. Which is why I didn't buy any; just made my own!

      Delete
  9. A great Idea! And to propagate Oleander is tempting too: I have a middle high oleander, rose-colored as I wanted, and to make a cutting is interesting. I don't have an Orangerie for winter - that is always a problem as our cellars are heated and thus not usable for plants. And we are not allowed to put plants into the internal staircase (which is the reason why my beloved oleander from many years died, sob).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This one is our biggest, and best provider of bright red flowers. If it takes, I'll put the new plant by the pool, where it'll look wonderful.

      Delete
  10. I’m a bit upset that you are choosing to call it ‘ McEnroe ‘ ..... ‘ Murray ‘ surely šŸ¤£šŸ¤£šŸ¤£ XXXX

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. People might think it was named after 'Pete' or 'Mints'; McEnroe is to the point, and is 'serious'.

      Delete
  11. Wonderful idea ! I can't wait to see if your idea work.

    ReplyDelete
  12. We'll see. I wonder if the original is black for the heat factor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's probably the cheapest colour for plastic; especially if it's been recycled.

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...