Monday, 3 July 2017

Weasel.


                              Résultat de recherche d'images pour "Weasel"

It must be about 20 years since I've seen a Weasel, then yesterday I saw one in exactly the same spot as all those years ago.

It's reassuring to know that even though they are unseen, they are still living in the same place.

Behind our house is a narrow pathway, and beyond that a bank, which was originally fronted by a stone wall; now totally covered in grass brambles etc. Presumably it is amongst the hidden stones that our weasels live.

These small creatures (6 to 8 inches long) are a sign that all is well with nature. I can't tell you how pleased I was to see this little fella today; especially as I expect Freddie has had his eye on him!

p.s. Not my photo.



39 comments:

  1. What as strange looking creature. Actually, as an Australian I really can't say that as we have some of the oddest.

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  2. What a beautiful little animal. All I want to do is pet him. I am so happy that he has appeared again.
    On another blog she follows someone who takes photos of and writes about Voles. I am enamored of both of these sweeties.

    cheers, parsnip

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    1. It'll 'ave your finger!
      I had one in one of my small mammal traps once, I was studying voles at the time.
      The trap was bouncing as the poor thing tried to get out.... I released it carefully into my big transparent bag so that I could see what it was.... it sat there looking at me.... probably as surprised as I was. It looked unhurt... which when I think back is obvious as there is room in the trap for a large vole to move comfortably. So, I carefully put the bag on the ground and opened the top away from me.
      After a moments hesitation.... it rocketed out of the bag and into the hedgerow! I not forget that little, charming vole hunter!

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    2. Well I would not really pet it. That is a wonderful story.
      Have you ever seen a Javelina, I love them and the babies look like hairy loafs of bread so cute. Adults are very protective of the babies and can (if they want to) rip you to shreds. Not to be messed with at all.
      They come in my side yard all the time.

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    3. I had to look-up 'Javelina'. They look a bit like our Wild Boar. I saw two young Wild Boar just last week; they are very shy creatures.

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    4. They look like wild pigs but they are related to the hippopotamus and are peccaries.
      They are very quiet and mind their own business.
      They come and lounge in my small ponds I have for the birds and critters that live around me.

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  3. That's a nice sight.... the last weasel I saw was many aeons past... undulating across the roadway and into vegetation.
    Here, we have a close relative.... a, or probably more, stoat(s).... the one I see is from the bedroom window, once or twice a year....crossing the slope up to the bridge over the millstream.
    It crosses left to right every time.... and I have caught it heading the same way on one of my camera traps.... my guess is that it has a route anti-clockwise around the meadow.... takes in both the millstream and riverbank. And you are right, the sight of these fierce little critters does say that there is still a balance!!

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    1. Very reassuring to see them around. This family manages to keep themselves hidden very well. I was lucky to see one.

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  4. I've seen pine martens out here but no weasels.

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    1. I once sheltered from the rain in an old barn where a Pine Marten was trying to catch a Bat. The show went on for quite a while, but he eventually gave up.

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  5. That's a cute little creature!

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    1. Absolutely. But as LaPré said above, they'd probably take your finger off; even though they're very small.

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  6. Plenty of stoats and weasels here on the farmland lanes and ditches. Beautiful and lovely little creatures, not very often seen. Beautiful for their smallness and their speed.

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    1. Q. What's the difference between a Stoat and a Weasel?

      A. A Weasel is weasily distinguishable, and a Stoat is stoataly different.

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    2. Bugger. You stole my comment.

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  7. Cute. Do you remember the children's song "... that's the way the money goes, pop goes the weasel"? I think I have just planted an earworm to go round and round my mulberry bush all day long.

    U

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  8. It was years ago that I saw a weasel or maybe a stoat. It ran across the road in front of us and was gone in a flash. Good to know you still have them where you are.
    Briony
    x

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    1. Frankly, I was very surprised to see it.

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  9. Haven't seen a weasel since NZ though k says there are some around here. Presumably they are weasel or stoats. I've never actually seen one

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    1. Very shy, like so many wild animals.

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  10. They run past my rural workshop often. Once I saw one with a mouse in its jaws.

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    1. Vicious little critters. I imagine that they are voracious hunters.

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    2. Built to go straight down the rabbit hole to collect their dinner, no messing about waiting for rabbit to come out.

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  11. Nostalgia Note: My Dad 70yrs ago had pet names for the family, Mum was Ferret, my older brother was Jumbo and last came me as Weasel.

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  12. We have a cottage on a lake in eastern ontario. We have a family of mink this year. It's so nice to see wildlife you thought was gone. Just a good moment.

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    1. Mink can be quite destructive. A lot were released from Mink farms back in the 1980's, and they became quite a nuisance. I think they had to be culled (but not for coats).

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    2. They are native to the region so its actually good. Beaver are the problem for us. They are destructive.

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    3. I believe that Beavers are being introduced into the UK's wild areas. I'm not sure for what purpose.

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    4. Re-wilding is the term used.... and the introduction in the U.K. is the European beaver which doesn't have the same habits as its American continent cousin....
      In the U.K. they have been shown to slow down the water flow from the cachement area of the rivers.... and they have increased the number of species of wildlife that are able to live there.
      The French reintroduced the ones here from French stock, a small, but viable, population exists to the east of the Massif Central.... they have spread out quite widely in the thirty years since they were introduced to the upper reaches of the Loir.... they expanded there quite rapidly, then used the Loire as their highway to spread further.... one has now established itself along the Aigronne behind our house.
      They don't build dams in the same fashion as the North American ones, and they live in the riverbanks.... and have pushed out the coypu! A double benefit there....

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  13. Cute little animal, but looks can be deceiving. I have never seen any around here, but I hear that many can be found south of me in Washington DC.

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    1. They're very small; not easy to see.

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  14. Although I don't think it's legal in CA, some people own ferrets as pets. I imagine that the ferret is a sort of domesticated version of the weasel.

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    1. Ferrets are much bigger, but look similar. They are used a lot for hunting Rabbits in the UK; very successfully.

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  15. They are quite common here Cro - maybe because we are not short of stone walls.

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    Replies
    1. Lovely. You're lucky. I'd love to see more of them.

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