Monday, 2 November 2015

More fruit trees.



I'm a little obsessed with the planting of fruit trees; in my practical mind, very few trees are worth planting unless they give you something to eat in return.

I'm reducing the size of the veg' growing area at Haddock's; in future I will grow fewer but better. I intend to pay more attention to the general health of my plants. I do know how to do this, but have previously been a bit lax. My father used to say that he (the gardener) grew 25% for the wildlife and 75% for us; I intend to make that 100% for us!

The new layout has now given me a small strip of land on which to plant a couple of extra fruit trees. They will need to be kept pruned, but still have plenty of space. They will take some sunlight in the early morning, but not enough to affect my vegs.

The nearest one (in the above photo) is an Apricot 'Rouge de Roussillon', and the rear one is a Plum 'd'Este'. 

I've not bothered trying to grow Apricots before on account of their early flowering and our occasional late frosts, but I keep hearing of bumper crops elsewhere in the area, so.....

Otherwise, I only have one other pukka Plum, so a second one is a good idea. Safety in numbers, etc. I'd really like a Victoria, but they're not available here.

Now all I have to do is wait. The Plum will certainly bear fruit, but the Apricot; who knows!




25 comments:

  1. My mum did something similar to you on her allotment and specialised, also cutting the amount of work that she was doing. She grows much more soft fruit now.

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    Replies
    1. I've also put in some more Blackcurrants; Lady M insisted.

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  2. When I moved to Wales I cut my garden by 75%, I now grow far fewer flowers, a selective mixture of veg and salads and fruit. I have 3 apples, 2 gooseberries, 2 blackcurrants, autumn raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, jostaberries and a Victoria Plum. I plan on adding 5 more fruit trees to an area that has ground shade for half the day. I grow varieties that are impossible to buy or are prohibitively pricey.

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    Replies
    1. I really miss having a Victoria Plum; maybe I can get someone to smuggle one out for me.

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  3. Oh, how I love fresh plums! My grandfather had a few trees when I was a girl. My favorites were the big purple ones.

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    1. I love all home-grown fruit. It's the picking stuff straight off the tree that appeals.

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  4. When I gave up my allotment I gave up a Victoria plum that fruited so heavily that the branches broke. The one I have in the garden has only fruited properly once - I miss my lovely old tree.

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    Replies
    1. I had one in Wales like that, and the fruit was all perfect; no worms.

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  5. I found some sloes in the hedge in the garden and made some sloe gin yesterday.

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    Replies
    1. Of course. Gin and sugar were the two items in the larder, I only keep the bare essentials.

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  6. It seems there is something a little wrong about cheating Mother Nature's children out of their share of your garden. Take care...she may try to get even with you lol.

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    1. They'll be looked after; have no fear!

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  7. It is good to change up a garden every now and then. Surprises with the results could be good and bad, however, watching something new grow is a thrill to any gardener.

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  8. I cannot imagine anything better than having an apricot tree in the garden - they are my favourite fruit. But of course it would not grow here so I must wait for when they come over from your area and arrive on our market stalls.

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    Replies
    1. I'm not sure yet whether they'll grow here either.

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  9. Best wishes to you and those new additions to your garden. To be able to pick ripe apricots from one's own tree seems such a luxury! Perhaps the climate changes that continue to spread their mysterious paths across the globe will be good for apricot growing in your area.

    Hope so!

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    1. I'm hoping so too, it does seem to be changing slightly. We are having less late frosts than before.

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  10. I have several friends that keep an apricot in their greenhouse and hand pollinate. They all pick lovely fruit but this seems a lot of work.

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    Replies
    1. I though they were supposed to be self-pollinating; I must look it up.

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  11. I lost five fruit trees this year from the weather and like you, think all trees should provide food or nuts. I have tried apricots, but they have died as our frosts come too late in spring. But, they are divine. We even have trouble some years with peaches.

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    Replies
    1. The only tree I've 'lost' here was an apple, and that was due to a fungus attack.

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  12. It's been a superb year here for apples and pears. The wildlife here ate nearly all my garden this year, so I shall give thought to what I want to do next spring.

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