Sunday, 14 June 2020

Topple, topple, topple.


                                               

Whilst the BLM protagonists are demanding the toppling of scores of statues, here's another cause that they might like to champion. The Guardian (a left wing UK newspaper) was founded on slave money, and should also be toppled.

The newspaper's founder, Mr John Edward Taylor (above), made his fortune in the cotton trade, on the backs of black slaves who worked in the US southern cotton fields.

Taylor was totally opposed to the ending of slavery. He supported the southern confederate troops during the US civil war, and he used his newspaper as a mouthpiece.

He also referred to President Lincoln's anti-slavery stand as 'abhorrent'.

If the BLM folk continue to demand that Winston Churchill's statue is to be removed, then logically The Guardian should certainly be closed too. Churchill wasn't involved in slavery; Taylor was!

It should be noted that 'Winston' has always been a firm favourite boy's name in Jamaica, which could become something of a problem.

I would suggest than many top politicians, big industrialists, and even today's oligarchs, have a few skeletons in their cupboards, but does this really mean we have to hide all mention of their existence; past or present?

If the BLM people become over politically selective, and demonise those they see as right wingers, whilst ignoring those who are left wingers (such as Taylor), then it can only be seen as hypocrisy.

What's good for the goose.... (as I so often say).

23 comments:

  1. It has all become very messy. We need our history recorded but not necessarily celebrate or glorify it. I've thought about writing a post about it but it is just too hard. Where does the line stop.

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    1. Having woken this morning to film of hooligans in London, and elsewhere, I really fear for the world's sanity.

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  2. What you fail to recognise is that the Guardian is a left leaning rag and hypocrisy comes in the DNA of the left. It also banks offshore and is a crap paper but most are these days.

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    1. It's also very little read.... about 10% of the Daily Mail's coverage, which most Labour supporters read.

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  3. Something strange that is hard to explain logically is happening all over the world right now.

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    1. It certainly is, and we must make sure that it's not all one-sided. The BLM movement should not be hijacked by one political party.

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  4. Sharp-eyed readers might have noticed that for a brief while my support for the BLM movement, and even for the Jewish people, has been criticised by a certain person. No doubt this person would also have criticised me if I'd been anti-BLM, or anti-Israel. You really can't please certain people. I do, of course, remove such comments as soon as I see them.

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  5. No point in trying. Loonies will loon.

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  6. Some causes will always attract more action than is necessary. However, it has brought to our attention the fact that we've been walking past some statues without any regard to what they actually commemorate. A statue of a person who promoted slavery should have been removed years ago, not now because of protest. As long as we don't re write the history books, I feel it's right that certain statues in public areas should be officially removed.

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    1. Such things should never be knee-jerk reactions to sudden events, but considered by councils, etc. Some should certainly go.

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  7. Should we remove Mandelas statue? He was a terrorist who's cell planted bombs that killed people, mostly ordinary working black people too. After the lesson from BLM is that no matter what good a person may do later in life they can never make up for the previous wrongs and thus must be destroyed. The same for Ghandis, a racist. And who of course could forget the child molester and slave trader Mohammed. All Mosques should be removed as they are dedicated to him? Where do we stop?

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    1. I have been severely criticised for mentioning Mandela's involvement in terrorism, but if we are going to praise his later work, we should be able to talk about his bombings as well. Let's be honest about lives.

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  8. I do believe that the discussion is confused.

    Let's look at the symbolism of The Statue. A statue commemorates a person's life time achievements as seen by the many in the then - not the now. A statue also means, by implication, that the collective "we" have put someone on a pedestal (not always for the right reasons). It therefore follows that those very people we put on a pedestal will be pulled down by those of us who put them up there.

    Before you misunderstand: I do not condone what's being done. However, I do understand the anger. Even if logic doesn't enter the equation of those causing the damage. To put it another way, Cro, have you never thrown (and smashed) a plate in anger? Please don't say no.

    Anger is rife. And it will out. Alas not always the best and/or most efficient and constructive way. I don't know how well versed you are in history: Think French Revolution. Why did people go on barricades, why did heads roll (including, eventually, those of the revolutionaries themselves)?

    Humankind is not cast in stone, we are evolving, children of our "times". And one last thought, who of us dares to cast the first stone? None of us, not even you, Cro, are unblemished. Main thing, in conclusion, don't put people onto a pedestal, hang pictures of them on the wall. Put them into history books, museums, appreciate them for the good they did, abhor the evil they may have done. The two, unfortunately, not mutually exclusive in ONE human being.

    U

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    1. All of that is true, but let's not be hypocritical when it comes to past mistakes. And no, I have never smashed a plate in anger. I'm not that type.

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  9. What matters is what is happening now. Calls to pull down statues or close the Guardian are merely symbolism. It is, however, the Guardian, and in particular the brilliant journalism of Amelia Gentleman, that has been repsonsible for bringing to light the continuing injustices suffered by the so-called Windrush generation.

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    1. Personally I despair at all the demonstrating, violence, and calls for statues to be torn down. Of course there have been injustices done to people everywhere, but it is all part of history. If we are going to nitpick over every event in history, we'll never get anywhere.

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  10. Tsk...and you look so Greek ! )

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  11. Well that would put the cat amongst the pigeons wouldn't it!!! :-)
    This is the problem - where does it end and why is it some people get cut a lot of slack while others don't? Why is it that some people have to be virtual saints while others can be convicted criminals and yet not be held to the same standard? It is all quite exhausting.

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    1. I hardly dare mention this, but the man who sparked all the recent troubles. Mr Floyd, was recently depicted as having angels wings. Well, well, well.

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    2. Well, you shouldn't have mentioned it IMO. George Floyd did not spark the 'troubles', the dirty cop with the knee on Floyd's neck did.
      No particulare reason, just because he could. By the way, you haven't regaled us with stories of Meghan Markle lately.

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