Saturday, 6 October 2018

New european fuel names.



Like all politicians everywhere, the bloody EU bureaucrats just cannot leave things alone.

Their latest interfering concerns petrol. From October 12th we are to have new and confusing names.

I'm not totally sure yet, but I think that what was Unleaded 95, now becomes E5. And the old unleaded 98, is to be E10.

The figures 5 and 10 relate to the percentage of biofuel it contains.

Unfortunately I hear that the addition of biofuel makes the petrol deteriorate quite quickly, and after just one month it can already begin to 'gum-up' your carburetor.

It is recommended to empty both mowers and chainsaws before putting them away for winter; otherwise, come spring, you might have a nasty surprise (of course, this may be internet 'fake news').

Thanks Brussels!



24 comments:

  1. We have 91 and 95 - hope they don't go changing things here.

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    Replies
    1. They can't stop themselves from interfering. They have to be seen 'doing something'.

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  2. I hope to stay forever with the 95 that i am using here.

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    Replies
    1. It's taken me years to get used to SP95; now they are taking it away. Grrrrr.

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  3. Just as you say 'bloody EU bureaucrats'. At least it's not just us they're picking on this time

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    1. It's the old adage of 'If you stop pedaling, you fall off'. They just have to stay pedaling.

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  4. E by gum! As they may have said in Yorkshire.

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    Replies
    1. Aye'up. (Is that how you spell it?)

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  5. Petrol always has gone "stale" although opinions differ as to how long it can be kept. My father always blamed stale petrol if something wouldn't start and he died in 1969 so I am talking a long time ago. So long as it is still clear which pump is diesel and which is petrol I don't really care about renaming but it is, as you say, another example of giving someone something to do where nothing needed doing.

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    1. Years ago it was just 'petrol, super, and diesel'. There are now three types of petrol, three of diesel, and four of liquid gas. I preferred it before.

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  6. They'll be making Pret a mManger put allergen advice on their baguettes next.

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    1. Don't be silly; of course they won't.

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    2. They only had to put it on for the homeless who got the free handouts after the sell by dates, silly.

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  7. I don't care what fuel is called but I do care about bio-fuel. I'm not convinced that it's environmentally sound nor mechanically sound either.

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    1. As far as I understand, you're right on both counts.

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  8. You have convinced me that it is cost effective to have a gardener to mow my lawn - thank you Cro.

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    1. And far easier on your back. And, just as a matter of interest, my people used to employ Norman Wisdom's son to mow their lawn!

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  9. E10 has been available here for a long time. The government pushed it to help sugar cane farmers, as that is what is used to make it. The 10 refers to the amount of 'contamination'. It is not popular here and has disappeared from many service stations. Anyone who knows anything about cars says to avoid using it.

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    Replies
    1. Interesting. I shall have to do more digging around this subject. Thanks.

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  10. Cro, the labels 95, 98, etc., will remain on the pump....
    what is happening is that they all will have a badge beside or under the pump label... viz:
    Normal SP95 and SP98 will get an additional round mark with E5 therein... to indicate that it contains 5% Ethanol...
    SP95 E10 will get a roundel with E10... for those drivers too thick to realise that the E10 that is there already means that it contains 10% Ethanol.... Super Ethanol gets one with E85... a lot already state this as part of the Super Ethanol name, but some don't.
    The Denzil labels are the most important additional labels, because the companies all tend to use different names for the same thing.... and peoples engines have been severely damaged as a result of adding what they think is their correct fuel.
    The gas fuels all keep their original Hazmat lozenges.... viz: LPG / LNG / H2 / etc.
    The change is to make things clearer to the user... and is a UN worldwide thing and not an EU directive.

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  11. And Rachel is right... petrol "splits" naturally, and always has done. When I started in Forestry 50 years ago, we were taught that any two-stroke equipment needed to be emptied of fuel if it wasn't being used for a month!!
    All ethanol fuels do this readily... and therefore, the same discipline should be followed... especially when the said item is tucked away for the Winter... or isn't going to be used for the Summer.
    The lighter component... petrol for two-strokes and ethanol for E-whatever petrols... rises to the top.
    The worst is the two-stroke as the oil clogs the jets.... meaning a complete carbureter overhaul... and on something with jets as small as a chainsaw.... new jets.
    Some people above have mentioned problems with E10 fuels.... yes, the ethanol attacks the rubber piping in ordinary cars... viz: my 2CVs and it burns hotter which can cause damage to the piston and head. My big Huskvarna ride-on has the E10 symbol in a circle on it.... with a line through.... never use!! This is repeated in the middle of the fuel cap.... a nice touch as the sticker with all the warnings will eventually peel off.
    My walk behind, Ferrari, two wheel tractor is a Denzil and has the B7 sticker on the fuel tank.... this machine is 10 years old.... so these "new" labels have been around that long... just not so publicly displayed.
    On an aside, the original Ferrari badges are decaying fast... so I thought I'd redo the important ones... I can't get hold of the Ferrari Agricultural badges.... but managed to get some Ferrari Sportscar stickers.... won't do anything for the speed, but it will look flasher than the rather manky green ones it carries at present.

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  12. It certainly is not good for lawn mowers either. I try to run mine empty at this time of year, mind you I have had to mow the lawn in December. Then I get the mower serviced and it has a rest for three months.

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  13. Thanks for the reminder Cro - no need to empty the mower because I've b*ggered it by mowing the cast iron ground fixing for the gate. A loud 'scrunch' and it cut out, never to start again. The shaft is bent and something else (forgotten what it's called) has cracked. This is only our 3rd season with it and now destined for the dump... :(

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