Wednesday, 30 April 2014

Garden Myths?



I always plant French Marigolds in-between my Tomato plants; I'm assured that they attract the nasty bugs away from all my bug-sensitive plants. I have no idea if it really works, but I do it anyway.

I also used to plant Caper Spurge at Haddock's to see-off Moles and Mice. Again I have no idea if this actually worked, but I religiously followed the advice and suffered from neither.

Mint, Chives, Sage, and Basil, are also supposed to work anti-insect miracles, so maybe I'll replant some up amongst my Beans Cabbages and Carrots.

I'm sure many veg' gardeners out there will want to enlighten me about beneficial plantings. Mostly I suffer from White Fly and Aphids, so any 'tried and tested' suggestions against these pests in particular will be gratefully accepted.

At present I am using 'wildlife friendly' slug pellets (for obvious reasons), a very small amount of natural Guano fertiliser (it's very expensive), and I occasionally water my plants with a diluted savon noir (a glutinous soft soap) solution against bugs in general, which is not always successful. That's it!

p.s. The above photo was taken yesterday during a very brief period of sunshine, otherwise it's been bloody awful here.


34 comments:

  1. My mother swears that lavender keeps aphids from her roses, my father just swears!

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  2. I've just taken on an allotment and thought why on earth is this there and that there etc, until the old timers came along and told me what needs to go with what to keep all these pest at bay so it must work.

    My first plant of parsnips have been eaten by French Quails, they are so funny though even though I won't be having any parsnips this year lol x

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    1. I once disturbed a Roe Deer sleeping under my Broccoli plants, but I've never had any French Quails (other than on my plate).

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  3. We also have marigolds at the ready. Better to be safe than sorry!

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  4. The garden is looking good! Onions are meant to help against carrot carrot fly but I've never noticed any difference. I think that a good rotation helps. I plant lots of normal marigolds but more for looks and salads rather than pest benefits.

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  5. In my raised beds I use the polyculture method mixing different things together so that the pests don't have a field day on one particular plant - flowers and herbs are in the mix too and I have never really had any bad problems so far - famous last words.

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  6. If you grow your carrots in raised beds you won't be plagued with carrot fly. They only fly up to twelve inches high.

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    1. Must be true as the allotment Mafia have told me this as well lol

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  7. Your veggie garden looks to be coming along nicely Cro. Ours is so hard after the Winter that the farmer is hiring a rotovator before we can plant. All we have got in is onions - they always do very well here, as do broad beans and peas. Carrots are a no-no.
    We stopped growing all brassicas because of bug problems - we have a good local market with plenty of fresh produce, and I am useless at cleaning up veg before preparing.
    I didn't know you quote about good land and thistles - I shall pass it on to the farmer!

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    1. The thistle quote came via a wonderful 'old timer' farmer in Shropshire. He said it had been his father's advice to him before buying land.

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  8. I will try your anti mole advice as I have a big mole problem, trouble is its in my lawn, he waits till I have mown then he destroys my good work, by the end of summer my lawn looks like a bomb site.

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    1. They're a pain. My father once a had a huge new lawn laid with turf, and the devils destroyed it over night. It had to be totally re-laid.

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  9. The way you have planted the plants are good. They look very neat. There is enough distance between each plant!

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    1. I think you may be my 200th follower, Welcome!

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    2. Ha ha..... I see I'm back to 199 again. Which bastard deserted me?

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    3. Twas me - I was messing with you! ;)

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    4. In which case please forgive me for calling you a b*s*a*d.

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    5. Of course - if you forgive me for messing with your numbers. All in fun!

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  10. I tried spraying 'savon noir' on one part of a cimbing rose that was infested with aphids. I saw no difference until I looked closely a few days later - all the aphids on the 'savon noir' part were deceased!

    We also use a little when we are washing the dogs and their coats are shiny and healthy.

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  11. I have always put marigolds in my garden. Even if they don't keep all the pests away, they do look pretty.

    I just installed red/orange film in my raised beds where I plant my tomatoes. It is advertised as keeping the ground warm, thus producing 50% more fruit. I used it last year and my neighbors were very happy to take all the extra tomatoes I had. I also did not have to do any weeding and that helped my aching back.

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    Replies
    1. We have no problems with our Tomato production here. I think our climate is almost perfect for them. But I sure could use a no-weed system!!!

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    2. No weeds is more important than an over-supply of veggies to me also, but it is interesting to see how and if it works. Tomatoes grow very well here too.

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  12. Our big problem over here in Maine is the Japanese beetle (Popilla Japonica). They go for anything even mildly aromatic and gobble it to shreds. Can't plant basil for it attracts them from miles around. Tobacco Hormworm (Manduca sexta) is a big problem as well. The make a mes of the tomato plants. Then we have all sorts of plant diseases and molds that ravage tomatoes and peppers every season and are impossible to stop. Tomatoes (fruit and leaves) are pockmarked with black cankers that rot before they ripen regardless of what you put on them to prevent it.

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    1. That sounds like a nightmare. Is it any better if you grow inside a Polytunnel?

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    2. I have not tried that yet, but it might be an option. I think will look in to it. The blight is something that comes from the poplar trees. I have noticed that when the neighbor's trees are affected then my tomato plants get is as well. But other neighbors gardens down the street are affected as well. We also get way to much rain and that may contribute to the problem.

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  13. My Dad told me to put some dish washing liquid in some water in a spray bottle to get rid of aphids and it has always worked for me. Your garden is doing well. I am still waiting for a dry day to till the soil to plant. I also plant the marigolds.

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    1. I think the 'Savon Noir' does the same job. I awoke this morning thinking that I would rotovate my patch... but it's bloody raining again. I've got a backlog of stuff that needs to be planted out.

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  14. At my old house deer, rabbits, slugs, cabbage whites, many nameless insects and creatures thrived on my vegetables always culminating in their enjoyment at the point when I was so pleased and happy with my garden, they would invade. Now I have grass and trees and I am happy.

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  15. At my last location, i planted tomatoes and basil together. I always planted marigolds in every bed, too. Nasturiums are also known for deterring many destructive insects.

    At my current location, i've not had much success. Hugest slugs i've ever seen, and now that i have the boat, i find i want to play on the water. Still, i think i ought to put in a few tomato and pepper plants at least.

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  16. There is some evidence that marigolds work at keeping some bugs away, but most companion plantings don't work.

    Gardenmyths.com

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