Friday, 27 April 2012

A Tree of Two Halves.



You may need to enlarge this to see what I'm talking about, but the Bramley above is all ONE tree.

However, this year it has decided to do things as TWO trees, by dividing itself in half. The half on the right is covered with flower, and will no doubt bear masses of fruit. And the other half, on the left, has next to nothing.

I can see trouble ahead. Two trees divided by a single trunk. Siamese trees. Winners and losers. Haves and have-nots. Yes, definitely troubled times ahead.

p.s. Amazing; my birds are still there!
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21 comments:

  1. The little building behind it..is it for rent ? need a holiday

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    1. Yes, but you'd have to share it with a noisy PUMP.

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  2. It should be OK - they are pretty hardy.

    "...On 31 October 1862, the first recorded sale of a Bramley was noted in Merryweather's accounts. He sold "three Bramley apples for 2/- to Mr Geo Cooper of Upton Hall". On 6 December 1876, the Bramley was highly commended at the Royal Horticultural Society's Fruit Committee exhibition. In 1900, the original tree was knocked over during violent storms; it survived, however, and is still bearing fruit two centuries after it was planted. ..."

    btw - baking soda bread this afternoon but trying another recipe to yours - has egg, butter, buttermilk and sugar with the flour, salt, baking soda and baking powder.

    If it turns out OK I'll bake some more on Sunday with oatbran added.

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    1. Good luck! Let us know how you get on.

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  3. What a strange phenomenon. Has it ever done it before. Perhaps it is something to do with the original rootstock. Or maybe bullfinches have pinched all the blossom?

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    1. It's always been covered all over before. I was wondering if it's because one side gets more sunshine than the other???

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  4. How strange probably has everything to do with the sun..

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  5. Your tree has simply adopted a human system of internal politics, there are now the haves and the have-nots. If you were to sidle up close and put your ear to the trunk you'd hear riots in the knots and endless branch debate and sap-delivery drivers going on strike ...

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  6. I wonder if one side has had frost/wind damage?

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  7. blimey, I've never seen a split personality in a tree before!

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  8. Maybe the one side didn't pay its taxes?

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  9. Hmm, i was also wondering about sunshine and wind being factors.

    We had three apple trees when we moved here, an ancient one, a middle aged one, and a young one. The ancient one fell over last year, showing just how much rot there had been, but even in its last season, it had a few flowers on one branch and none on the others.

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  10. How interesting. I've no idea what's what but the theory about frost sounds plausible...

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  11. After reading the other comments, I discover that Bramley is an Apple. The tree and blossoms looked to be that, but we on this side of the pond and clear over to the Pacific Pond know so little about real apple trees. Thanks for the horticulture lessons. Free, I'm hoping?

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  12. sunlight. the part of the tree blooming looks as if it grew rapidly out and away to seek more sun. new growth = more blossoms?

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  13. That really is extraordinary. I think it's probably all to do with the amount of sunlight it gets.

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  14. Well, why should your tree be any different than the rest of haves and have nots of the world?

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  15. If it is modeling human brains, then of COURSE the right brain bears the flowers. Perhaps the left will bear the fruit?

    Beautiful on both sides, regardless.

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  16. Lovely...you should paint this Cro...

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