Monday, 6 July 2020

Another one bites the dust!


                                 

We had become used to frequenting a relatively newly opened bakery in our small nearby town.

It was run by a young couple (as are so many), who were very industrious and eager to please. You may remember my writing about their 'loyalty card' scheme to reward 6 baguettes de tradition purchased, with a 7th one free (above). An offer of which I often took advantage.

I now hear that they have closed, and the couple have already moved away.

Newcomers, as in so many places, are often viewed with suspicion. A couple opening a bakery in direct competition with another that had been long-established, is regarded with even more suspicion. The locals could not be seen to be supporting 'the enemy', so they mostly stayed with what they knew. We, on the other hand simply went where they sold the best bread.

Small town (I would call it 'village') mentality can be seriously detrimental to the overall welfare of life in the country. Employment is hard to find out in the Styx, and to hound-out two young people who were working hard to make a success of their new business is, frankly, disgraceful. I don't know all the ins and outs of the matter, but I'm pretty sure I know roughly what happened.

Had they been poor quality bakers, I wouldn't have given the matter another thought, but they were GOOD bakers, and for me that was all that mattered.

They won't read this, but I would like to send them my very best wishes for a more successful business elsewhere! I miss them.

32 comments:

  1. I'm not sure what's happened, but I'm still having problems replying to comments. I like to reply to everyone, so please forgive me if I don't.

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  2. That's a shame - I hope they have moved somewhere where they are appreciated.

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  3. That is so sad, the bread looks wonderful.
    parsnip

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  4. Lockdown wouldn't have helped a new small business either.

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  5. I always used to feel sorry for that '2nd' bakery competing against the other shop. The town has changed so much in recent years.

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  6. Indeed that is a shame. I have 'loyalty cards' from cafes and it's the 10th that's free. I realized that your baker was giving the free one after you buying the week and really helping you buy their daily bread.

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  7. Many small businesses do not survive because of the lockdown here as well.

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  8. Sadly this mentality seems to be prevalent in village communities, it still exists in small villages in the wilds of West Cumbria.

    Your Opinel looks so bright and shiny, is it a new one?

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    1. I expect I cleaned the blade especially for the photo!

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  9. I wonder why they thought they could succeed.

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    Replies
    1. Optimism, I imagine. That and expertise.

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  10. It's like that in our village. Can't have anything changed or new.

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    1. When I was briefly living in Shropshire, a friend of mine (also a newcomer) asked the owner of the garage how long it would take before he would be accepted. The garage man replied "Ten years". My friend replied "Remind me to leave in nine".

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  11. What a shame. How is the bread from the remaining baker?

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    1. We actually go to another baker now, in another village. However, the remaining baker does make good bread too.

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  12. I have just read that the couple had their van's tyres slashed, as they were about to leave. What a nasty bunch some of them are; I shall never think of the town again as I used to.

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  13. Just testing replying. Google is being difficult these days. I go in with a gmail account via Chrome, but its a real nuisance!

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  14. I've been in my village over 30 years but I would still go where they make the best bread. There really are no "locals" anymore anyway so sod that!

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  15. Much the same in villages and small towns here too.

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  16. It's always difficult starting for outsiders starting up business in a small community. They were unlucky with the virus. I wonder if otherwise they might have continued because they had a good product and selling ideas.
    I hope they do better elsewhere

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    1. I think they'd been there for 2 years, so all this started much before COVID. I think they may be better off in a bigger town; I hope they do well elsewhere.

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  17. I don't suppose COVID19 helped their business.

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  18. Small businesses usually have a rough few years trying to establish themselves, but being in a small village with a population who have a loyalty, cards or not, to to their local stores, makes it often a very hard endeavor. Add to that the virus which is sickening people but also the economy. They were up again too much.

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  19. I've heard that a young French baker and partner were stuck in NZ due to lockdown post holiday. They took over premises in the small township and are being well and truely welcomed and accepted by the locals - who very much hope that they will remain there and provide a much needed service of good fresh bread and cakes.

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    1. Potty, do you know which town by any chance?

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  20. That really is a shame. Small towns around here can be much the same way, though. We lived in a tiny little town for three years and the locals always looked at us with what seemed like suspicion. So much for the friendly small town stereotype! We were happy to move back to our mid size city.

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  21. Cro, you've beautifully summed up an unfortunate side of small town living. Where i live, we have more small businesses than large establishments, and i worry for many of them with the prolonged lockdown we've had. I support ones as I am able, and like you, am sad when they shutter because they can't make a go of it.

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  22. Oh dear, what a shame and to have their tyres slashed was really nasty. It must be really hard wherever you try to start a small business .... I remember watching The Worlds most Scenic Railway journeys ... one was in France.... La Ligne de Cevenne .... at one stop in a tiny village, he met an Englishman who was making his own beer and selling it and was very successful. I guess there’s no rhyme nor reason as to whether you will be accepted. I hope the bakers make a go of it somewhere else. XXXX

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  23. I would welcome them in my neighborhood

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  24. Ah, yes. I live in such a village. As a "come here", not a "from here", life always was uphill. I had to travel the country from show to show; the locals would not support me. Their loss.

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