Friday, 9 January 2015

Hare today, gone tomorrow.



A post-Christmas present from Monty.

It's impossible to scold a dog when it catches an animal; hunting is simply part of their nature, and they see any catch as a gift to the family.

A neighbour's dog used to join me on my morning walks, many years ago, and he too caught me a Hare. In fact this is the third I've had thanks to dogs.

The one above is now skinned, emptied, and cut up into convenient size pieces, and is awaiting being made into a wonderful Civet de Lièvre. It would be a sin to waste it. Wouldn't it?

Thank you Monty; you naughty boy!



53 comments:

  1. It doesn't look at all injured. Did it die of fright, do you think? Monty is not to be blamed, as you say, it is instinct.

    I've never eaten hare (I'm sure your dish will be delicious!) but I do remember eating rabbit when young. The 'rabbitoh' would call around to the house, selling his wares. A cheap meal, back in the days when we had very little. Do rabbit and hare taste similar?

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    1. We think it did die of fright, which is quite common. As for taste, Hares have a slightly stronger taste but are very good; especially cooked in red wine.

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  2. Definitely shouldn't go to waste. I've never had hare and would be interested to try it.

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  3. We don't see many hares around here any more - such beautiful creatures.

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    1. For some bizarre reason we have no rabbits, but plenty of hares.

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  4. Elsie came trotting in a few nights ago carrying a rabbit's head (complete with ears). From the possessive way she behaved, I don't think she saw it as a gift to the family.
    Enjoy your hare.

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  5. I've only had hare once but I remember it being really nice. It would be a shame to waste it after all!

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  6. Many years (decades) since I tasted hare.
    I don't know if it still applies, but it had the unique distinction of being considered game in some counties and vermin in others.

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  7. It think I should die of frieght if my dog would bring me dead animals.

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    Replies
    1. It was 'freshly' dead; still warm.

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  8. My mother used to cook a lovely rabbit stew! Enjoy your hare.

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  9. In South Norfolk there are many hares, I suppose we have the type of habitat they like and contrary to what the media might like to tell you when knocking farming practices they are thriving around here. I can cook a hare believe it or not. Cover with red wine, the more the better, and onions and peppercorns and cook slowly for three hours and serve with red currant jelly (optional). Tastes gamey and nothing like rabbit.

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    1. I've added coarsely cut bacon, button mushrooms and Armagnac. Very much like a Coq au Vin, but with Hare. I've just put it on to cook.... I reckon about 3 hours too, then re-heat this evening.

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  10. Eating is a respectful way for it to end up. I am all up for picking up roadkill, as long as it's fresh, and not flattened. Never had hare, but wasn't too keen on rabbit.

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  11. Albert brings in rabbits sans head.........
    It's all a lot gorier

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    1. This was pretty gory John. I've never liked dealing with Rabbits or Hares.

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  12. Our local game-dealer/butcher sells hares at £14 each. I don't like buying them as I hardly ever see them, unlike rabbits. Your title for this post was execrable, btw.

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    1. Pleased you liked the title.... I did have others in mind, but even I refused.

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  13. Charlie brings me land crabs... Which is good going when you think about it, they have vicious claws and die fighting, not of fright!

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    1. Are land crabs good to eat? I remember in The Cayman Islands the roads were covered in them.

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  14. I have never had hare (plenty of rabbit) we can see them in the field across the river, but they don't seem to be on our side at all. Do you use all wine or add water or stock?

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    1. I've used all wine; about a litre. But I shall top-up with water. I once topped-up with wine too, and it became far too rich.

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  15. It also happens to be my BACON making day today, and I've just stuck the pointed end of my knife deep into my finger. Blood everywhere. Lady M has just returned from dog walking and nearly had a fit. Think Sweeny Todd's back room!

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    Replies
    1. Fingers always bleed well.

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    2. About a pint spilled out of mine.

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  16. It would have been wrong not to Cro ……. what's the difference from cooking Monty's catch or one from the butchers ? I was always a bit sad when our animals brought dead creatures in but, such are the laws of nature. Even domesticated animals still have that killer instinct in them. ….. no-one says anything when they watch animals catch their dinner in the wild, do they ?
    I'm sure that you will both enjoy your hare tonight with a glass or two of red !!! XXXX

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    1. We will; it's smelling wonderful already.

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  17. Good for you for not letting the animal go to waste, and what a good boy Monty is to bring home food for the family! The only thing my dogs have ever killed are squirrels.

    I've never eaten rabbit, and wouldn't have a clue how to prepare one!

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    1. The skinning, emptying, and butchering of Rabbits and Hares is not pleasant; but there's no alternative if they come in their natural state.

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  18. Now that is a good dog. Rabbit braised and finished with a coconut cream and rosemary sauce is as good as it gets. Something like this, just add rosemary to the initial braise.
    http://pafarmersmarket.org/web/recipes/rabbit-in-coconut-milk/

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    1. That does sound good, but I think I'll stick with my trusty Civet de Lievre. If you were here to smell it, I think you might agree.

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    2. Sounds like an elaborate process but does sound quite delicious. Anything like this?
      http://honest-food.net/2008/12/30/classic-civet-of-hare/

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    3. That's it. But my 'household' version is much more simple. Just the Hare, mushrooms, bacon, armagnac, onion, and red wine, with all the usual herbs etc.

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  19. I googled Civet de Lièvre, because it is totally foreign to me (groan), and all came up French. I chose Wikipedia and requested a translation. I must copy and paste again:

    The hare is one of the iconic dishes of the gastronomic meal of the French . It is cooked with red wine , the bacon , the onion , the shallots and herbs . The civet of hare hare becomes a stew when his sauce is not related to blood.

    I believe Monty's hare had a fine send off.

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    1. I've always used that same recipe; it seems to have stood the test of time, and is delicious.

      I can also do it with my eyes closed!

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  20. Looks like a perfect kill! Well done Monty. Our farm dogs have never brought us a rabbit but we certainly have seen dead possum and raccoon, all seriously mauled and well chewed. Monty appears to have far more couth than our two mongrels.

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    1. And he's not even a 'hunting dog', more of a retriever.

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  21. You probably don't know it Cro - but the hare is my favourite of all animals and I have pictures, statues, cards - the lot everywhere. I love them, maybe because they are very common in the fenland of Lincolnshire when I was a child. I could never, under any circumstances, eat one - and hate to see them dead. But having said that - my dear old mother adored jugged hare - her favourite dish.

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    1. Weaver, we didn't really have much choice in the matter. Monty was rooting about then suddenly turned up with a Hare in his mouth. The amazing thing was that he dropped it.

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  22. Am I the only one Cro that thinks you should have prepared it for Monty?

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    1. He had the liver; a special prize!

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  23. Of course you should cook it and eat it. Well done Monty.

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    1. It'll be consumed within the next few hours. I might even take some pix.

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  24. Cro, the hare in Nebraska (middle state of USA) is known as a Jack Rabbit. They are hunted in the winter months of the year. They are known for making good stew and the fur is used for inside warmth for leather gloves.

    Have a great rabbit stew day.

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  25. Good boy Monty! I remember having jugged hare when I lived in London in the Seventies, the first (and last) time I've eaten it.

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  26. What a beautiful looking creature. Looking at it makes me feel hungry.

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  27. Sad. I love hares. I've had one run towards me when I was out on my bike. I stopped and he came quite near...looked me up and down...then loped off!
    I know I'm a veggie,but I can understand a healthy hare tasting better than any rabbit!

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    1. I was recently working at Haddock's (my veg' patch) when one came towards me. He was about 2 yards from me before he realised I was there. Then, like yours, he fled.

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  28. Mais, oui, it would be in terribly bad taste to let that lovely rabbit go to waste. (Much better to let it go to waist!)

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  29. In my corner of North Yorkshire we have plenty of hares wonderful taste and useful too as a keen fly fisher and fly tyer the Hare provides a wonderful bonus it even has a fly named after it. The gold ribbed hares ear....

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