Friday, 10 November 2017

Scrumpalicious.



We've already had one slight frost, so opportunities for scrumping are now very limited.

However, one abandoned nearby ancient tree always produces fruit that stays on the ground well into the new year, mostly without any ill effects.


Our own stored Apples have now either gone soft, are riddled with bugs, or are rotting; none of the better known varieties seem to 'keep' any more.

This particular Apple (above) should be in everyone's orchard. It's sweet, with a very pleasant flavour, and is probably one of the best 'keepers' I know. One can but wonder why it isn't available at garden centres everywhere.

No-one seems to know its name, or why it fell out of fashion. I shall take a few cuttings next year, and see if I can continue its line before it's lost for ever.



23 comments:

  1. So many apples on the ground.amazing that they last so long.
    You certainly should try a cutting.
    We have a truck which comes every week from the Greek city of Tripoli. They have wonderful apples, no popular variety, red, firm and delicious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. These particular Apples are the same every year; they drop, and stay fine for months. As the tree is not in a field, not even Cows eat them.

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  2. Bought some Cox's Pippins yesterday, my favourite apple.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My next-door neighbour had a wonderful tree; then he pulled it out. I could have cried!

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  3. A pity we have trouble importing plant material into N.Z.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Probably very wise, considering the problems we have with imported bugs etc.

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  4. Lots of apple trees around here which could do with being scrumped from, but alack and alas, they are all in people's gardens.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Night time, heavy facial camouflage, and a lamp. That should do the trick!

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  5. The Spotted Lantern bug just came in our area this summer. It decimates fruit trees and grape vines. One week you see a few and in very quick time, thousands are swarming around. Right now there is nothing that can stop them. If they don’t come up with something soon, our local apple orchards and wine businesses will be hit very badly. This bug comes from Asia.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The whole planet seems to be being invaded by awful bugs; it could be our downfall.

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  6. I think you'll have to take some grafts of this apple tree and graft them onto some of your own. Kev, over at http://www.englishhomestead.com/ has done this loads of times and somewhere on his blog you will find details of how to do it. I managed to do this myself a couple of years ago with a very late fruiting apple tree that was in a hedgerow and to my amazement it actually worked! The following year the hedge was cut and the apple tree disappeared so I was glad I did.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have taken cuttings from ancient varieties, and they do grow. I shall take several, and cross my fingers.

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  7. Worra lorra windfalls !!! They should keep you going for a while !! XXXX

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I scrumped another lot this morning!

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  8. We used to have James Greaves apple trees when I was young. I have never seen them anywhere to buy and would love to as they were delicious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think we had one too. My people always had good orchards.

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  9. Weaver had some wonderful posts about apple trees and their apples. I loved reading about them. I can tell you all about citrus trees but I know nothing about Apple trees.
    Hope your grafting works. I wish I could walk to some old ancient trees like you.

    cheers, parsnip

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are lots hereabouts. One finds Apples almost anywhere, many of which I suspect are self sown.

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  10. These older varieties are worth hanging on to. Hope your cuttings work...I haven't had success with apple cuttings...what is your secret!!?
    it would be worth trying grafting or even sowing a few pips as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I saw it on TV. In early Spring you take a 2 ft length of last year's growth and take the top 6 ins off. Plant the resulting twig to about half its length, and keep well watered. I always do several; just in case.

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  11. Hopefully it is in a seed bank somewhere.

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