Tuesday, 2 August 2016

The World's Most Controversial Question.



Putin and Obama have argued about it, as have The Pope and Elton John, and The Queen and Prince Philip. It's the question on everyone's lips.

Which is better; Marmite or Vegemite?

As someone who lives in a country where there are no fixed allegiances, I think I can give an honest and independent assessment.

Of course it's MARMITE. Vegemite doesn't even come a close second; but don't mention that to an Aussie.

Even so, I do rather like Vegemite, and have recently received the above tube as a present..





79 comments:

  1. Seems as your grey matter is on vacation!

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  2. What is that stuff, anyway?

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    1. Marmite is a very salty, dark brown, yeast extract, that we Brits spread on buttered toast for breakfast. Vegemite is a poor quality Australian imitation that tastes of earth.

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    2. It is also a brilliant brain-wave someone had about what to do with all the sludge left over from the beer-brewing industry - sell it!

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  3. I have tasted Marmite and I like it, but I believe you cannot spread it on as it were jam - I did that!
    Greetings Maria x

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    1. The more the merrier. I love Marmite.

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    2. A friend is bringing one back for me; apparently (says she) stimulates appetite and helps take away nausea...?
      X

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    3. It also cures cancer, mends broken bones, and can solve the problem of world conflict. It's an all round 'good egg'.

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  4. I too like Marmite but, if I could only have one, I would choose Bovril..... I don't recall having ever tasted Vegemite !!! XXXX

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    1. I went off Bovril years ago, and I can't even remember why!

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    2. Two completely different experiences really, aren't they ? I love both, greedy little piggy that I am !!!! XXXX

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  5. I have never eaten Marmite.

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    1. Well, now's the time. Go forth, throw caution to the winds, and buy a jar.

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    2. Bovril is beefy and is not really a spread for cuecumber sandwiches or to just scrape on buttered toast. The 500gm jar just about lasts a year for us.

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    3. I always had it as a hot drink when I was ill as a child.

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    4. I preferred bread and dripping.

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    5. Bread, dripping, AND Marmite. Even better.

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  6. Marmite. Vegemite can be a little bit grainy for me

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    1. It's the earthy taste that makes it slightly inferior for me. I hadn't noticed graininess.

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  7. Marmite comes a poor second to vegemite. Boiled eggs and vegemite on toast. Tomato and lettuce on toast with Vegemite. I could go on.

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    1. Good. That's the first vote for Vegemite! I WAS hoping to start a fight.

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  8. Vegemite! Marmite's a bit too strong for me, although I do like it too. Not seen it in tubes yet here though.

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    1. The one above is a plastic 'squeezy' pot. I prefer it this way as no-one can leave bits of butter or toast crumbs in it.

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  9. Well as someone who has lived in Marmite and Vegemite territory I can say with absolute conviction and bias that there is only one that is really edible although Vegemite can be used for filling cracks in walls and so on.

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    1. I had some on toast for my breakfast this morning. It wasn't really a pleasant experience.

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  10. I wonder if Ozzies are also divided as a nation into those that like Vegemite and those that don't?

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    1. I imagine Marmite is prohibited in Oz, so they probably have no choice.

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    2. No division amongst true Aussies, Vegemite always wins.

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    3. We're happy little vegemites
      as bright as bright can be
      We all enjoy our vegemite
      for breakfast lunch and tea
      Our mothers says we're growing stronger every single week
      Because we love our vegemite
      We all enjoy our vegemite
      It puts a rose in every cheek
      Whistles and claps!!!!!

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    4. Oh dear.... do they have a song about Marmite too?

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    5. Any more smart comments and I will sing the Aeroplane Jelly song:)

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  11. I love Marmite spread on toasted soldiers and dipped into soft boiled egg. Now that statement should get some of your international followers wondering what the bloomin eck I'm talking about.
    Jean

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    1. That is one of the greatest ever uses of Marmite.

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    2. I do wonder what the bloomin eck you're talking about! This whole discussion is a mystery to me!

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  12. We lived in Australia for a couple of years and as a good "mum" I volunteered to work in the school cafeteria to help prepare lunches. They asked me to make Vegemite sandwiches. I never tasted the stuff and I would have killed a lot of students if someone hadn't seen me slathering it on like we would peanut butter in the States! The other Aussie mums decided I would be safer chopping lettuce. Good times!

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    1. To be eaten with caution; very thinly spread.

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  13. Haven't tried Vegemite, so can't give an informed opinion. Like many British children of my era (immediate post war) I was brought up on it, and still enjoy the occasional toast with Marmite, though I use it more for flavouring stews these days.
    I think it was also a substitute for butter when it was severely rationed. At least we didn't notice at the time that there was no butter on the toast - just the Marmite !

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    1. We had dripping. Much nicer than butter any day.

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  14. Vegemite also goes beautifully with avocado on top !

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    1. Ah Helsie; I was waiting for your comment!

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  15. Marmite on toast, simply the best!

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  16. Marmite, blue cheese, n tiny slivers of olives on oat cakes yummmmmm

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    1. The computations are endless. Tom Stephenson once fed me on Nasturtium leaves thinly spread with Marmite, then rolled into tiny tubes.

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    2. Not a delicacy I have tried 😀

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  17. Oh yes, Marmite soldiers to dip into a soft boiled egg. I can't really tell the difference between Marmite and Vegemite, you don't see Vegemite on sale much here.

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    1. Yes, that's a real English traditional nursery tea ! Bread toasted over an open fire, then cut into four or five strips, buttered, and then Marmite spread on top

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    2. The strips were known as "soldiers" but I've no idea why - perhaps Cro knows?

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    3. No, no idea. I imagine it was to make them sound more interesting.

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  18. I haven't tried either one. They aren't popular here at all. It doesn't sound particularly appetizing to me, unfortunately. -Jenn

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    1. They do say you either love it, or hate it. I am the former (with Marmite).

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  19. I looked it up on Chowhound since I never tasted either. I think it is an acquired taste, and by it's description, I am sure I would rather jam.

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  20. It must be an acquired taste or raised on it. I tried marmite in London and wanted to wretch. It was horrible. Think I'd just as soon eat the rotten shark fin delicacy in Iceland than that. Poop on a stick. Sorry Cro.

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    1. I imagine it must have come as a shock; I've been eating it since birth.

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  21. Vegemite is known to me by name, not by taste. I think I will stick with my on and off relationship with Marmite. A little jar lasts me quite a long time.

    My neighborhood grocery store, the Fairway, stocks it in the same area as English mustard. Maybe it's time for me to start a special shopping list.

    Best wishes.

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    1. If Marmite lasts so long in your cupboard, I wouldn't bother trying Vegemite.

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  22. Thinly spread Marmite on toast...mmm heaven.

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  23. No thank you to all of the above, I'm not a big fan of huge amounts of salt.

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  24. It's been fascinating reading the comments. I discovered that Marmite has been mentioned in 25 posts on my two blogs either by me or as a comment.

    Marmite produced in New Zealand by Samitarium and sold in Australia and the Pacific regions is an entirely different product from that produced in the UK and sold in the rest of the world (and in New Zealand as My Mate). In the antipodes there is another substance (I use the word advisedly) called Vegemite. which was first produced in Australia in 1922 and is revered as the very essence of being Australian.

    Marmite comes, as you doubtless know but some of your readers may not, from the 'marmite' which is a French cooking pot after which the original earthenware Marmite jar was modelled.

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    1. I was once given a jar of Marmite by someone from Oz, and I could only think that it was made in some Chinese fakers back room; it was ghastly.

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  25. Replies
    1. I haven't had Bovril since..... I can't even remember.

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    2. Well it won't taste quite the same...
      they've been reducing the beefstock levels... the latest is down to 41%!!
      The've even tried to foist on the public a vegetarian Bovril...I mistakenly picked up a pot...
      it made a fair Marmite substitute!!
      BUT it weren't Bovril... and it weren't real Marmite either...
      now to have some crispbread with Marmite on... this has given me the munchies!!

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  26. After a hard day in the office (not really) we would return to the Mess for tea with toast and Marmite followed by The Magic Roundabout. That's how the RAF was 50 yrs ago.

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    1. It possibly still is today, although now it would be the Teletubbies.

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  27. As always (time difference, ya know) I'm late to this debate. I haven't read the comments (yet) but I have to say that I just LOVE vegemite and couldn't imagine life without it. But then again I am an Aussie,though of European stock.

    To their credit, and though it was very foreign to them, my parents saw the value of this cheap but vitamin-packed spread and it was a staple in our home.

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    1. I've never met an Aussie who has a good word to say about Marmite.

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  28. Twiglets! Do they even sell them when it isnt Christmas? Yum.

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  29. As an American, I feel I shouldn't have an opinion. However, I admit I am partial to Marmite. A thin layer of Marmite on buttered toast hits the spot!

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