Sunday, 31 August 2014

For Tom.



It would ruin Tom's year if I didn't moan about my overwhelming Quince crop. So if anyone would like some Quinces, please send a stamped addressed truck to me, here and I will send you a tonne or two by return. 

As usual the tree is groaning with fruit. I will make an effort to eat one or two this year, but I shall still end up putting most of them on the compost (to join all our grapes).

My preferred way of eating Quince is to peel (difficult), quarter (very difficult), and core (even more difficult), then roast the prepared quarters with either a chicken or a joint of pork. Try it; delicious.

I used to make classic Quince jelly, or occasionally Membrillo, but no-one eats it.

Shame isn't it. Why can't my other fruit trees be so consistently generous. Sod's Law, I suppose. 

On my way to the airport yesterday I saw a dozen or more trees that were similarly overwhelmed; everyone seems to have the same problem.



32 comments:

  1. It is the same here with grapefruit.

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    Replies
    1. I like Grapefruit; I'd eat one every day if they grew here.

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  2. dont you make quince paste? It is wonderful with cheese, or baked quinces? Yum. my husband makes a great quince paste

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    1. This, I presume, is the same as Membrillo. It's just TOO SWEET for us, even though I love it.

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    2. Being an Ozzie I dont know membrillo but I was brought up on Elizabeth David. the paste doesnt have to be too sweet we dont add as much as the recipe says but as I dont make it I dont know how much he uses! One of the advantages is you dont have to peel the quinces and you throw in all the middle bits as well.

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  3. I love the thought of sending a stamped addressed truck - my quince tree is in its infancy - after reading this post I don't think I want it to grow up.

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  4. A quince is like a Rubens arse.

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    Replies
    1. Actually 'Quince' is the Serbo-Croat word for 'Voluptuous Bottom'.

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    2. Is it the same for melon do you know?

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    3. Someone's just stolen my Serbo-Croat dictionary...

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  5. Such a first world problem we have! You must have the perfect growing conditions because i dont think ive seen such laden trees here.

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    Replies
    1. I thought you could grow just about anything in Oz.

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    2. Depends where you are. Perhaps i just dont know the right gardeners. Oz is so big we have the full spectrum of growing climates at the one time. My girlfriend and i are 45 minutes apart and she has a completely different growing climate to me. She is much higher and colder.

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  6. Yes, quinces are incredibly hard fruits. They are delicious stewed with pork etc as you mention above.

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  7. I shall try the roast idea with quince as they grow in the garden and I have never known what to do with them except for the jelly. Thanks

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    Replies
    1. I'm roasting some tonight with a chicken.

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  8. I have friends originally from southern Italy who lament the lemons and oranges falling to the ground on their families property. There really can be too much of a good thing.

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    1. I once scrumped a couple of Oranges from the trees lining the Ave Mohammed V in Marrakech. When I returned home I made two jars of marmalade with them.

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  9. Our quince tree, after being being very productive has got a terrible case of "quince blight" and has produced NOTHING this year and looks to be dying. After making jelly (which no one really liked) I used to put them at the end of the drive for sale and they usually sold.

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    Replies
    1. When I was small I loved Quince Jelly, now I just find it far too sweet, and almost sickly.

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  10. A very large green Dragonfly is hovering about 12 inches from my face, studying me very intensely. I wonder what he thinks of me?

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  11. Sounds like our crab apples - we have about a dozen trees around the farm and they unfailingly produce quantities. I did make crab apple jelly one year but it was a chore and we only ate it now and again with cold meat. Eventually it went mouldy before we had eaten it all, so now we leave them to drop off and be eaten by the cattle, who seem to love them. I have never seen quinces for sale in a greengrocers over here.

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  12. Have you ever looked at the blog called The Quince Tree?
    Here are some things she makes with hers:
    Quince Recipes
    Quince jelly
    Quince cheese
    Baked quinces
    Quince upside down cake
    Quince tarte tatin
    Quince vodka
    Quince and pumpkin chutney
    Stewed quinces

    Just a thought.

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    Replies
    1. Someone recommended this to me last year (was it you perhaps?). We do make Quince Tarte Tatin, but it ends there; other than roasted.

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  13. What a fantastic crop of quince. It's been a good year for fruit. Our apple trees are loaded - such a shame when they have to go to waste

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  14. Is it a coincidence that the " you might also like" posts all have a similar, er, rounded and pendulous paired appearance?

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  15. What is a quince? I've never knowingly met or eaten one.

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    1. I suppose it's most like a 'perfumed' Pear. When cooked it becomes delicious, but when raw it's as hard as rock.

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  16. Try this handy-hint: Stick 'em up yer arse!!!!!!!!!!

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