Tuesday, 4 December 2012

My Own Fault.



On the packet it said 'Giant Cinderella Pumpkin', so I was expecting the business.

I'd planned to hollow it out to make a two-roomed cottage; a little place to retreat to if times became hard. But what I got was hardly big enough for a mouse sized thunder-box.

I suppose, had I watered it throughout the long dry Summer I would have needed a fork-lift-truck to bring it back to the house, but I neglected it. I shan't bother again.

Poor Cinders wouldn't have got very far in this pathetic job; Pumpkin soup anyone?
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24 comments:

  1. An acquaintance of mine grew two over 1000 lb. pumpkins. They both had names (one was Henrietta, the other I forget, but had an equal number of letters) and they took constant attention. I don't know about you, but I have better things to do with my time.

    Your pumpkin is a nice representation of what a pumpkin should look
    like. I am sure you will find something delicious to make from it.

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  2. Let's hope that underneath the red exterior it is an edible pumpkin.

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    Replies
    1. Unfortunately it's also very light (in weight). Opening it up may prove even more disappointing!

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  3. I have never attempted to grow a proper pumpkin but this year has been a bad one for squashes etc. I only got two out of all those I planted and they were spaghetti squashes, which taste awful, so like you, I won't be bothering again.

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    Replies
    1. I normally only grow Butternut Squashes. Even if the above grown HUGE; what would I have done with it all?

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  4. Are you quite certain that you haven't just cross-bred an onion with a pomegranate?

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  5. you have been polishing it mr cro!1

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  6. Never mind Cro, that colour is absolutely stunning!

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  7. We had two of these from a friend...they weighed about 45 pounds each and the sheep loved them! They had few seeds though (the part they like best). Yours is quite lovely.

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  8. Slice it up, pour honey over the pieces and roast them. They'll make a delicious snack.

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  9. I think it's quite beautiful...

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  10. Here's an idea Cro....dry the seeds and send us each two (one to grow and one to go). We'll post pictures of how well we do. A 'gourd-a-thon' if you will.

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    Replies
    1. I like the idea. Pumpkins of the world unite!

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  11. Squash as abodes? Highly overated. Eat the sucker.

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  12. mine turned out to be gourds!! very pretty but no good for soup!

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  13. Growing a proper giant pumpkin takes not so much time as it does preparation. That is the soil needs lots of goodies added to it and yes one needs to do a bit of watering. I love the red.

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  14. Still a fine looking specimen. The seeds are yummy eating, and i've got a recipe for pumpkin squares (calls for the tinned variety of pumpkin, but fresh would be divine).

    Besides, easier to carry this way.

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  15. Fine looking thing....and now I really really want some pumpkin pie......

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  16. I'd love a seed! Unfortunately, belatedly, New Zealand doesn't like plant and animal material to slip in without a biosecurity hazard check. Was it a 'hubbard squash'? Did it have any other name? The colour is absolutely wonderful.

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  17. Ah but tis a beeyoootiful pumpkin! What a gorgeous colour! (See - typically girlie statement! Sod the practicalities - it's pretty!! ergo that will do!)

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  18. That's a very red pumpkin. Beautiful actually. Maybe it's purpose is just in being so pretty.

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    Replies
    1. I wonder if it would 'dry'? I'll leave it in a warm place.

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  19. It's lovely to look at. Even if it isn't fit for habitation or consumption, maybe simply being lovely is enough.

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