Tuesday, 12 September 2017

Season's offerings.



The Chestnuts have just started falling. With hardly any rain over the past month or so, I expect the crop will be smaller than usual, but still enough to have a few roasted over the fire on a cold night. 

Also in season are the Quinces. This year Lady Magnon has made both Membrillo and Quince Jelly. It remains to be seen if either will be eaten. I bought a Basque version of Manchego cheese, specially so we could experience the classic combination of the cheese with Membrillo. Not bad!


Of course early Autumn wouldn't be complete without plenty of Figs. This is our daily lunchtime quota.



25 comments:

  1. The figs look good - I presume that would be between you.

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  2. Cro, have you tried poaching the quinces in wedges....
    it is what we do most, now!
    Half a quince, the juice you poached them in.... and some homemade vanilla ice cream!

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    Replies
    1. Mostly I peel, slice, and roast/fry them. As we are inundated at the moment, I'll try poaching too. Thanks.

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  3. Good luck in eating your quinces. I recently just chucked out the last jar of unwanted quince jam, years old.
    Seems odd seeing together the figs which are august fruit here and chestnuts which I think of as winter crop

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    Replies
    1. Actually our Figs started ripening in August, but are continuing through September. I eat a few every day.

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  4. The figs look wonderful.
    Lucky !

    cheers, parsnip

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    Replies
    1. I have about 8 trees dotted about. I love them.

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  5. I have threatened Sarah with a mushroom and chestnut tart.

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    Replies
    1. I roasted a Turkey on Sunday evening (yes, I know), so the arrival of the Chestnuts was just perfect. re your tart: I would have thought that a Vegan would be in heaven.

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  6. We have figs here only in august,the only fruit that i love.

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    Replies
    1. Ours will go on for a while yet, they ripen in turns.

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  7. You have three times our whole yield of figs on your plate!

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    Replies
    1. We had a big Fig tree at my people's place in Shropshire; it never gave a single Fig.

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  8. I have probably told you this before but my Moroccan cookery book has three quince recipes in it, quince and chicken tagine, quince and lamb tagine (the quinces are cooked separately and added to the meat when cooked) and for dessert, poached quinch, poached with lemon and cinnamon for 2 hrs.

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    Replies
    1. We are trying to use them a bit more this year. We feel terrible throwing them all away every year.

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  9. There are wonderful quince/apple/jalapeiros chutney recipes, which are really delicious with cold meat, cheese or even rice. Are you eating the figs with goat cheese or some comté ? You're a lucky man in getting all this from your garden.

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    1. We usually eat the Figs directly off the tree, just as they are. We have plenty more from the garden, this is just a tiny selection.

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  10. Quinces, figs and chestnuts - three 'fruits' which never seem to be at the exact perfection of ripeness here sadly.

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    1. I've never understood how Chestnuts turn up in the UK at Christmas. Here if you leave them for a week, or more, they turn black inside.

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  11. I am jealous of your abundant fig supply - I have to buy them and pay £1 for two.

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    Replies
    1. Oh dear. If you could see the amount on our trees, you'd cry. They are covered (as they always are).

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  12. Ah, those lovely figs. Brings back memories from our holiday in your neck of the woods in 2015. Never tasted figs like them, certainly not here.

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  13. I love the blog post, and you helped me make such a fun card with it!
    หนังเกาหลี

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