Saturday, 15 April 2017

Les Yeux De La Colline.


I am perfectly aware that this short (23 mins) film will not appeal to, or be understood by, everyone.

It describes how life has changed over the past 40/50 years or so; certainly since I've been living here. It also shows how one young woman is trying to make a go of things where others have failed (not too successfully by the look of it).

The film shows both my area, and the lovely people who've made it such a pleasant place to live.

Women such as Paulette were typical of Southern Perigord. We had our own 'Paulette' as a next-door neighbour, under the name of Madame D. She was, and still is, a great inspiration; sadly she died back in 2010, but her influence is still very much with us today.

I must thank my friend Craig who originally posted this on Facebook. I am re-posting for your pleasure.

It's worth watching; all 23 minutes of it.





26 comments:

  1. I really wish my French was good enough to understand this. She looks like our neighbour Vaso but with a wonderful smile. These women are amazing in their strength and determination.

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    1. Such people were happy with their circumstances, nowadays they want 'everything'. Life hasn't improved for them.

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  2. I am off to visit my 93 old father in Tel Aviv, when i shall come back at noon, first thing i'll watch it,i am sure it i'll enjoy it.

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  3. Wish there were subtitles (or I could understand French! Such a beautiful language.)

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    1. Unless you're used to it, the accent isn't that easy to understand either.

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  4. Fascinating. I am in awe of women like Paulette, they work so hard.

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    1. For very little reward! She is typical of the area; or at least how it used to be. She's a dying race.

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  5. I learnt French at school but not good enough to understand it; I'm missing important things they're saying here. The scenery looks so familiar to some of your photos; vegetable garden, fields, hills, market place...
    I like that stone wall.
    Greetings Maria x

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    1. It was filmed a little to the north of us; but not far away. The countryside around us is beautiful; about 25 kms to the south it becomes very flat, as it is about 100 kms to the north.

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  6. The hot weather and the different farming of your area are apparent but I am reminded of the old-timers and small farms around here too and slowly disappearing (but not yet completely). I couldn't understand a word of it. The girl will want her EU subsidy

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    1. I think the girl, St├ęphanie, is a townie with ideas of being a 'paysanne'. Her market stall din't seem to have much on it. Rose tinted glasses come to mind, but good for her for trying.

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  7. I have started watching the film but have to go out so will watch it on the big screen at my leisure this evening. I astonished myself by understand much of what was said although I'm sure during 23 minutes there will be some stops for head scratching and re-winding. I have passed it on to several of my Francophile friends with whom I have shared much time in France over the last three or four decades.

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    1. As long as you get the general message of the film, that's all that's needed. I'm sure your friends will enjoy it. The characters all seem so familiar.

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  8. Just like our older neighbours here really. I found the accent a little difficult but you still get the gist of it.

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    1. Paulette is very much of a type. You find them all over the area; even down to the way she dresses.

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  9. I liked is so much and even could understand a lot.Thanks.

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  10. Despite having taken French right up to the end of grade 13, I only caught bits here and there. I did enjoy seeing the surroundings and their farm. -Jenn

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    1. The two older people are explaining how things have changed with the introduction of new machinery, etc. Like most older people they don't approve, and regret the passing of the 'old ways'. I must say I agree with them on many points. The camaraderie of everyone helping each other has now mostly gone.

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  11. I love the way Paulette dresses - the way folk used to dress around the country area here - alas such things have vanished. But this is really a silly viewpoint - all our ancestors might think that so called 'progress' was not good but when I think of a woman's life today compared with then, there is no contest.

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    1. Women here used to take a pride in that form of dress; it somehow represented hard work and service to the family. I do occasionally see those 'house coats' still for sale, but I'm not sure who'd buy them today.

      I don't think it's the actual progress that they dislike, it's more what it's taken away. That old camaraderie, which I remember so well, has now gone.

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  12. Thanks for the link. I have seen such a huge change in the last 15 years we have lived in France, in Limousin/Perigord, just north of you. When we first arrived, you could see not just full time sellers, but a few mainly elderly ladies selling their surplus stuff in the markets: 4 or 5 pats of goats cheese, some lettuces, maybe a few dozen eggs. Now, that's all gone as you have to be registered to sell produce. You can't sell from the gate either. You can't keep goats or sheep without being registered, nor get them slaughtered. The supermarkets are now opening for longer where they were once closed at lunchtimes, Sunday and Monday. Most of the bars and restaurants have closed down as they have all gone bust, due to red tape, taxes etc. Sad, another way of life on the way out: globalisation will get us all in the end.

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  13. How I wish I could speak French!

    Jo in Auckland, NZ

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  14. I think you and your readers would enjoy one of my favourite movies.
    " Un hirondelle fait un printemps" with Michel Serrault.The film deals with this subject. It has subtitles for non French speakers

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  15. Than you for sharing that. Superb.

    Marcel

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