Tuesday, 11 November 2014

Cro woz 'ere.


                                  OE Bricks 1

When I left school, it was traditional to carve one's name into the bricks of a wall. Some of the more ancient walls became totally overcrowded, so other more recently built walls were used in their stead. The one above seems to have been adopted by boys from my era; I recognise a few of the names.

I have mentioned previously that I've left a carved Maltese Cross in all the homes I've owned, as proof of my passage. I wonder if the idea of doing so originated from the above?


This is my most recent Maltese Cross, which is on the 'tower'.

Have you left your mark somewhere? Will you leave your mark somewhere? Or does the idea simply seem frivolous?



21 comments:

  1. The mark I leave isn't so permanent as yours...I always plant a lemon tree in every place that I live. (When there's a garden, that is!)

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    1. I like that. I'm a big tree-planter too; I planted one on the very day of each of my grandsons births.

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  2. William Wordsworth was very fond of doing this - in the Lake District his name seems to be scratched everywhere.

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    1. Winston Churchill left his initials all over the place too.

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  3. I carved a little head out of wood once when I was 14. I nailed it to a big beech tree in the middle of the New Forest. It's still there, but the tree has kind of engulfed it now.

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    1. I love it when trees swallow up objects. I once had a bicycle trapped in a Chestnut tree, but usually it's just wire fencing.

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  4. I'm plastering today, so my hands are covered in white muck.... I'd better not type too much.

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  5. We've lived in our house for 50 Years and I have written on the walls under the wall paper, just different things about our family.
    Briony
    x

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  6. My job involves leaving my mark pretty much everywhere I go, but I never sign it.

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    1. I was thinking of writing the names of everyone who works on the barn underneath the interior walls. One very high-up beam has the name of the original builder written in blue chalk.

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    2. Write the cost of the whole thing as well - that will be worth finding.

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  7. My dad was a carpenter and it was usual for him to leave his name or initials and the date somewhere in houses he worked on. He inherited his mother's house when I was about 7 or 8, extended it and modernised it for us to move into. I have a vivid memory of him taking me to granny's house one winter evening and him writing his and my initials and the date in a stud wall partition. It's still there.

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    1. And why not! Forever part of the house.

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  8. Unfortunately, we who use the Internet are all etched forever in Googleland.

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  9. Not frivolous Cro - a lovely idea but it is a bit late to go back to the eight homes I have had. Wish I had thought of it sooner.

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  10. I'm a bit like Weaver …. I always mean to do it but, usually forget ……. although, I always left my name on my form desk at school.
    Our last home was built in 1654 and we found many scratched letters on the beams. Our home now is late Victorian and there are a few messages scratched into the brickwork and behind the wallpaper. XXXX

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  11. We have left our mark all over Menagerie Manor. I planted a giant Redwood after the birth of our son’s 38 years ago. Our eldest son planted a Birch tree on the birth of our grandson and when he and his wife divorced I moved the tree to Menagerie Manor. When we went to Sedona last year we purchased a “Love Lock” engraved with the date of our marriage and it is permanently locked to the front door to the house.

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  12. I don't think I have a recurring mark. When I moved out as an adult, I did leave a huge hole in the wall from a dancing accident that I never owned up to (covered with a picture to hide it). My mother called me later on to complain!

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  13. I put a child's china tea set in the hollow of a giant oak tree in hopes that some child in the future might find it.

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    Replies
    1. Gosh, that's a good one. I hope someone does find it (before it's chopped down, or falls down).

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