Saturday, 20 January 2018

Brown Betty, and the question of Tea.


                                    Résultat de recherche d'images pour "kettle with seive on spout"

In my opinion there is only one pukka type of Teapot; the traditional Brown Betty.

There are a million different fancy Teapots around. They come in all colours, all shapes, and with all types of ghastly patterns, but none compares to the plain brown standard design; usually with a blue interior.

One of my late mother's prized possessions was her extra large Brown Betty that was always known as her 'WI Teapot'. Goodness knows how many cups of Tea it contained; it was huge..

A good Teapot shouldn't dribble, it should be light enough to be maneuvered with skill, and it should be unobtrusive, so as not to take one's mind off the matter at hand; the pouring of Tea.

What one serves with one's Brown-Betty-made afternoon Tea, is another question. Personally I suggest one centimetre thick slices of Battenberg, or a couple of McVities dark chocolate Digestives, or even a slice of Lady Magnon's excellent Lemon Drizzle Cake. The choice is yours.

One thing is certain, however, the Brown Betty makes the BEST cup of Tea.

N.B. The milk in first, or after, question will never be resolved; it's all a question of 'upbringing'. And as for the time of day for the drinking of Tea.... I shall make no comment.



42 comments:

  1. *Is* there a time of day when it is inappropriate to drink tea? (Apart from the time of day when you happen to be drinking wine, that is. In my experience wine and tea do not mix well :D )

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    1. You're right. Tea after 5.30 pm should be banned; and be exclusively reserved for wine.

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  2. I can't remember seeing one like that. The teapot that doesn't dribble is precious. I only have a tiny amount of milk in tea and always it it last.

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    1. The Brown Betty is the standard English Teapot. I'm with you on the milk and timing.

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  3. What a bautiful teapot.We here drink our tea in a cup with a tea bag,when ever we like, no tradition at all:)

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  4. All shops selling teapots should be forced to have a tryout area.... where you are allowed to fill your chosen teapot with hot water and try its pouring qualities.
    If it doesn’t pour well, you empty it and hurl it against a brick wall.
    If it pours well, and doesn’t dribble, you go to the cash desk and have the pot tastefully re-boxed, pay and leave.

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    1. You and I obviously have a lot in common. I would go slightly further and suggest that the name and address of the manufacturer should be noted, and the factory burned to the ground!

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  5. I have a pretty teapot set with golden rims and tiny roses painted on it gifted to me by my in-laws on our wedding day, it was their wedding day present so it is a very old set which I only use for guests. I have a similar teapot to the one in your picture but it's white. Your tea timre is like our capuccino time here; never after 10am in the morning!
    Greetings Maria x

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    1. I forgive you your fancy Teapot, as you are not in England; otherwise the Teapot Police would be sent at once!

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    2. Haha. Now every time I make tea in there I will remember this comment!
      x

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  6. Brown Betty is a charming teapot. No hand knitted flowery tea cosy? We have the milk jug to go with it.
    Somehow tea never tastes the same when I drink it alone. I only drink tea when my english friends visit, otherwise it is coffee

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    1. We too have the matching milk jug. I tend to be the same re Tea and Coffee, and usually opt for a quick cup of Nescafé (although I wouldn't admit as much in public).

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  7. We don't tend to use a teapot but I do like my tea served in a fine china cup or mug. Tea with breakfast and tea at 3.00 in the afternoon.

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    1. A nice old China Tea Service is perfect. We have several packed away (who hasn't), but we tend to use very simple, plain white, cups and saucers. Tea time varies here, between 3.00 and 3.15; we're hopeless timekeepers.

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  8. Your Brown Betty is gorgeous , but if one day you can travel to Japan and visit a traditional pottery , you will find treasures of wonderful teapots. Japan has a long long tradition.

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    Replies
    1. The Japanese tradition of Tea drinking is VERY different to that of England. They do have beautiful pottery.

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  9. For over 20 years we have been using a S/S teapot that pours beatifully and has three little legs. It's just the right size for two big mugs and the china ones that it goes in. M.I.F!

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    Replies
    1. The Teapot Police will be sent to inspect!

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  10. In style, my teapot is the same except it's a generous one-cup size and in Cornish blue. No dribble and makes the perfect cup of tea for me.

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  11. That would never do in the Outer Hebrides. Here the metal teapot traditionally sits on the Raeburn festering for at least 15 minutes before it's considered fit to drink.

    I, however, drink Red Bush or Earl Gret or Lapsang Souchong and have not taken milk (or sugar) in tea for as long as I can remember.

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    1. I'm a Lapsang, no sugar, and slight nuage of milk person. Lady Magnon prefers 'builders'.

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  12. Nain had a giant teapot. Perhaps it was a Brown Betty. I never knew they had names. But she had even bigger kettle, a big black thing the size of a cauldron which seemed to have a permanent residence on top of the glowing coals. I don't remember anybody drinking anything else in that house. It was nothing but tea. You'd have a mug in your hand, or if was Sunday a cup and saucer, almost before you'd got your coat off.

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    1. We have an old fashioned kettle that bubbles away on our wood-fired cooker. It tends to be filled with lime scale, so has to be filtered. It makes good Tea though!

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  13. That is a very pretty teapot. You would be horrified if I told you how I make my tea so I will spare you the gory details.

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    1. Good; I'd hate to have to send in the Teapot Police!

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    2. Please dont tell me you make it in the microwave with the bag in the cup, Starting over...

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  14. IT'S BEEN RAINING HERE ALL BLOODY DAY. YUK!

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    Replies
    1. Have a cup of tea and a piece of cake. It just started raining here too and that's what I did. Green tea of course. I use a tea bag in the cup and it is perfect.

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    2. That's exactly what we've done. Lady M made a Banana Cake.

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  15. I bought a red Le Creuset teapot before Christmas and it dribbles like crazy. Pouring out a cup of tea results in a large puddle on the table. It's quite dreadful but it serves me right, I bought it for the colour. It was made in France... do the French drink much tea?
    I've always wanted one of those brown teapots, beautiful in their simplicity. They are difficult to find here, I never see them. xx

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    1. It's probably a French anti-tea-drinker plot. I hope you read LaPré DeLaForge's comment above. Dripping Teapot spouts are the devil's work.

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    2. I would love a RED teapot. I have recently fallen in love with RED. New, used RED Jeep, red front door, red toaster, RED little German teacups, etc. I'm with you for RED. I have a Brown Betty somewhere out in the shed. Hate to admit that I don't know just where it is.

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  16. I bought a Brown Betty a while ago and never got to use it!! Somehow the little lid got wedged on and would NOT come off. I tried everything I could think of, and eventually threw it in the trash out of frustration. :(

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    1. Very strange. I hope you weren't storing your Super Glue in it!

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  17. A friend of mine has one. The lid broke so he put it back together with Gaffa Tape. He is still using it.

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    Replies
    1. Built to last; even with Gaffa Tape.

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  18. Just been the same route - dribbly spout , leaky lid the lot.Finally acquired the twin of your's.Excellent!

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  19. We have that exact tea pot, we also have a hot water pot as well. I wonder if it tastes so good, because of cleaning the damn thing, it being brown if you cant get all of the residue out and the build up makes it take good?

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  20. You've got it right with the little Brown Betty beauty! mine was demolished in our move last year. still looking for one

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