Sunday, 8 January 2017

Winter Wild Flower.



We've had morning temperatures of -6 or -7 C recently, yet I came across this tiny flower yesterday, it was in the middle of a field with no other similar plants around it.

It's a beautiful little flower, obviously unaffected by sub-zero temperatures, and with loads of small flower buds ready to open.

I'm wondering if it might be worth digging-up and re-potting. Does anyone recognise it?

Bad photo, I'm afraid.




21 comments:

  1. It looks like a Johnny-Jump Up or some sort of a small viola.

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    1. I've just had a look on Google, and I think you may be right. Perhaps a wild version; I'd not heard the name before. Thanks.

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  2. I agree, small viola, Johnny jump up or similar.

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  3. It looks like a pansy. We call it viola or frate (friar) in Italian.
    Greetings Maria x

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  4. Well that's it then. It's a viola.

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    1. I wonder how it got to be in the middle of a field.... a bird I suppose.

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  5. Replies
    1. I'll dig it up, and look after it.

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  6. It's a Wild Pansy, also called Field Pansy. A wild flower, but also a kind of agricultural weed. You shouldn't have any problem having a whole field full of them if you dig it up and propagate it!

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    1. So, not as unusual as I'd imagined. I know nothing about flowers!

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  7. We are still getting the odd wild viola out along the sides of our drive in spite of a cold spell. They are pretty little things and seed like mad. I would give it a try - but don't keep it too warm.

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    1. I shall go and see if I can still find it!

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  8. Viola tricolor, Also known as Johnny Jump up (though this name is also applied to similar species such as the yellow pansy), heartsease, heart's ease, heart's delight, tickle-my-fancy, Jack-jump-up-and-kiss-me, come-and-cuddle-me, three faces in a hood, or love-in-idleness, is a common European wild flower, growing as an annual or short-lived perennial. It has been introduced into North America, where it has spread. It is the progenitor of the cultivated pansy, and is therefore sometimes called wild pansy; before the cultivated pansies were developed, "pansy" was an alternative name for the wild form.
    From Wikipedia
    The flowers are edible and make a pretty addition to a Summer salad.

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    Replies
    1. I'll try to remember Johnny-Jump-Up. I'm not good with names.

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    2. We call them "heartsease" .

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  9. What a cute bloom. I hope you manage to trans-plant and raise it.

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  10. Isn't it lovely to discover something beautiful, and then to learn more about it? I also have seen such sweet little flowers over in Central Park.

    Way below freezing over here today, with wind chill added to the mix, after yesterday's snow. Nice to be warm indoors.

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    1. It was a much bigger plant than I'd thought, and is now planted in a pot on our terrace wall. 0 C here this morning with still more colder weather to come. No snow as yet!

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  11. I was thinking viola or pansy but waited on the consensus for confirmation. It's very pretty!

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    1. It's a nice little flower, and the plant has loads more buds waiting to open. I have a feeling it will be permanently in flower.

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