Tuesday, 2 December 2014

Poem in an Unknown Language.


                           
                         


Trendla trendla yarna hoo

Somtery aurabel larding to.

Pemanbello ansenfellow trandly ing

Mantargo lullingberry tinage fing.

Manso manso tuttelmust fardo

Wizzing trizzing diddledum lardo.

Armay frindig ootoom atch

Sandog trattleditch tiddledin snatch.


© Cro Magnon 2014.


22 comments:

  1. Cro, sounds like Irish double talk to me. It's something that almost sounds like I should be able to under stand but can't quite grab ahold of it.

    Have a great unknown language day.

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  2. I like this poem,Cro. So far as I can translate it, "hoo" is Maori for price, "fardo is Somali for horse", "lardo" is Esperanto for bacon or Javanese for lard. Put together with all your rhythmic modifiers, I get a love poem --one in which the suitor offers his lady reliable transportation for a fair sum and diet high in fat. Deeply moving.

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  3. fing is Estuarine! I recognise that being a Southend girl.

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  4. Ostem laughsem middledum do.
    Pistem listem phaggle fum o.

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  5. OK you've finally lost it. Bring out the straight jacket.

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  6. Another version of eenie meenie minie mo:
    Eeena Meena Mackeracka
    Dominacka Chickapocka
    Lollippa, Kung Kung Kush

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    Replies
    1. The old 'eenie meenie minie mo' wasn't too PC; not that we ever thought about that... until we were told!

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    2. Our version was
      Eenie Meenie Mackaracka
      Rare I domenacka
      Chickeracka
      Bom Bom Push

      Where on earth did I dig that up from and what on earth does it mean?

      Delete
  7. Whatever it is , it reads nicely out loud ! I like weird sounding words. Used to love " The Jabberwock".

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    Replies
    1. I immediately thought of it too!

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    2. I'm available for Poetry Readings.

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    3. But NOT in Trelawnyd (see below).

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  8. Put the wine glass down
    Walk slowly away from the wine glass......

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  9. The only bit I understood was the last word.

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  10. It is double Irish, Milliganese in fact.

    Jean
    x

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  11. n?Do you remember the old 'backslang'? We used to think we were really clever to use it as teenagers. I kept getting the impression that this was something similar, but although I kept moving endings and beginnings around, I got nowhere. Nonesense the

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  12. Mamash yafe umeragesh,
    tachzor mahar beshesh,

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  13. I don't have a scooby as to the meaning, but then I often don't understand poems written in English.

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  14. That is one fantastic poem!!!! Yes!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Gwen; you are obviously someone of impeccable taste.

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