Monday, 10 September 2012

Bottled Figs.


Food, food, and more food. Almost overnight, our Fig trees are filled with ripe, and semi-ripe, fruits. For preserving purposes we need them to be semi-ripe.



When trimmed, and pierced, they are boiled for about 5 minutes, then refreshed in cold water. They are then packed into jars (I do 9 to each 500 gm jar; see final picture), given a good splash of Armagnac, then topped up with a syrup made from 500gms water to 300gms sugar.


After the capsules and screw tops have been carefully put in place, the sterilising takes between 45 and 60 mins, and the jars left to cool in the water.


This is the finished job, and no need for labels. In mid-winter, when we're huddled by the fire, we shall eat these with a big blob of either Crème fraiche, or Fromage frais. Let me assure you that they will be heavenly; and the syrup equally so.

I'll do one more batch of four bottles; then my next major job will be our Paté. Life is all about FOOD at the moment. Preserve it; or waste it!

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24 comments:

  1. It's a shame that people can't be preserved in a similar manner.

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  2. They look delicious - a busy time of year for preserving for me too - nothing as exotic as figs though

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  3. This post has made me even more furious that my figs are rotting on the trees....next year will be so much better organised. I will also save this post so I know exactly what to do this time next year. J.

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  4. What a yummy thought....Figs are great anytime,I also will save this post in case some come my way.

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  5. As we left to go away on holiday the figs on our little tree were showing promise - doing surprisingly well on a Welsh hillside. Sod's law will have it that they all ripen and drop off before we return on Saturday. Am rather inspired by your preserving recipe. We've eaten them preserved in a similar way, but spiced, a good accompaniment to cheese.

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  6. Those figs look so good. I like storing summer sunshine, ready for the dark days of winter.

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    Replies
    1. That's how it feels, Elaine. Release all that goodness when it's dark and cold!

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  7. Your bottled figs look heavenly.....wish I had a fig tree !!

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    Replies
    1. You shouldn't have problems growing figs in LGP. Provided you have the space, of course.

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  8. I have been eating fresh figs here in Ireland for the last three weeks, simply delicious!
    Did I forget to say - that they were imported from Belgium :)

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  9. What beautiful-looking preserves!

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    Replies
    1. And I really enjoy preparing them too..

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  10. They sure are beautiful in those jars, Cro. I like your recipe, I should give it a try next season.

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  11. You eat like a king. Figs and neighbour's peaches... you just have to, really.

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  12. Now, THAT'S what figs should look like! I haven't seen any in our area that look even half as plump and healthy. Maybe peach and fig preserves next?

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  13. Oh, they look gorgeous! Far too cold here to grow figs, unfortunately.

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  14. Hello. I hope you will explain your method a little more in another post. I preserve fruits in the same manner. Well, the syrup doesn't have brandy. But my canner is porcelain lined and has a wire basket in it to keep the jars from bouncing on the bottom. In a pinch I have canned stray pints in a small pan, but with a cloth on the bottom. You seem to be using a garden variety galvanized wash pan. My mind is open; explain your process. Thanks!

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    1. I usually put some type of cloth at the bottom, but don't find it makes any difference. That old pan is the only one I have that holds 4 jars (I have another that is too big). As long as the jars are processed at a rolling boil, for the correct amount of time, almost anything will do. It's the cleanliness that I find the most important; cleaning the rims of the jars before placing the capsules, etc.

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  15. Delish.... and life is all about the food over here in Portland too. I am enjoying local berries this time of the year.

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  16. Aha, so this is how I beat the wayeyes to my figs. I certainly get plenty (about April here) at the pre-ripening stage. I remember eating tinned figs with cream in a tiny Cafe in Chelsea, but I like the sound of Mountaineer's cheese accompaniement as well as your Creme fraiche and Fromage frais.

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    Replies
    1. They should be almost ripe; before when they start to hang downwards.

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  17. Ta for that,the leaves are just un-furling right now :-) Oh I meant waxeyes by the way.

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