Sunday, 3 June 2012

Goodness Gracious, Great Bales of Hay!


OK, it's just a hay bale, as seen in almost every country in the world. A bit of grass, a bit of sun, a few machines and hay-presto!

But, mes amis, this is not just any old bale, this bale comes from OUR land; and it's our VERY FIRST bale. My friend José has just finished his first round of hay-making, and this will go to feed his gourmet cows this winter.

In the days when they still produced small rectangular bales, at the first sound of the baler we would all grab our pitch forks and head for the fields. Getting the bales inside whilst still dry was essential, and we all set-to with  real purpose (and a lot of fun). Nowadays these big round bales are usually left outside until time allows for them to be stacked somewhere more convenient. José, I'm pleased to say, usually takes them away within days.

Imagine trying to lift one of these mothers onto a trailer with a pitch fork!



18 comments:

  1. It's POURING here. I was looking forward to a local village 'boot sale' this morning.... looks like it's a total wash out!

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  2. Your very own hay bale! Wow, can't compete with that. I was looking forward to the boot sale too. Oh well, the garden will enjoy the rain.

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    1. I've just been out in the rain, and noticed that the bale was taken away last night. Perfect timing!

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  3. It must be similar to getting that first, fresh laid egg.

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  4. Your own hay bale - isn't that romantic?

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    1. Huge oaks from little acorns grow!

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  5. It's well done! This Kansas girl has a weird romantic reaction to hay bales, but then there's always all those Impressionist paintings with gold bales gleaming in the sun against a blue sky. I've always wanted to sit on one and watch the clouds go by.

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  6. Round bales are the norm here now.

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  7. That is the most beautiful first bale of hay I have ever seen and I have seen a few let me tell you. You need to hand out some cigars...but not too closely to the bale! And beacuse you were kind enough to ask, our last interested potential buyer decided the farm would be too much work for him ! (Tell us about it) Even though he was just 30 yrs old. Little wimp. Of course I'll word that differently on my blog later today.

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    1. Oh dear, sorry to hear that Donna. I'll uncross my fingers (for the moment).

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  8. A picture worth taking, I'd say...Congrats on your first bale!
    Your photo reminds me of wonderful days spent on our farm. I use a John Deer tractor with forks to lift our huge round bales for the Semmental's.

    from a by-gone farm gal, who can appreciate.
    Grace
    (thanks for your visit)

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  9. I've just been watching The Queen on TV. What an amazing spectacle; makes you proud to be English (and part Welsh).

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  10. Looks some nice stuff. Harvesting is a dawdle these days. I've just been watching the Queen on the telly too. Not even the weather could spoil anything it was brilliant.

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  11. It IS a beautiful bale! now u must start on the world's largest ball of dog hair!

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    1. Amazingly, they've both stopped moulting for the moment.... but you've given me an idea.

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  12. It's beautiful...and am I the only one who sees a face in the center?

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  13. And a lovely bale it is, too -- glistening off the sun. But alas, I did love the ambience of the old balers and their little square bales -- and of whole families and friends out in the French country June sun...

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