Sunday, 19 June 2011

Fathers Day.


Today's the day when we all think of our fathers; those that are still with us, and those that are not.

My father died about 30 years ago. His interests were mostly concerned with the making of money, and going for long weekend walks with my Uncle John. He was not a gregarious man, but was very generous both to his family, and to everyone who worked for him.

I don't remember my father ever playing cricket or football with me; he just wasn't that type. And frankly, he was probably at his most relaxed when my sister and I were away at school; which (as children) we were most of the time.

I'm pretty sure that 'fatherhood' confused him. I don't think anyone had ever told him how a 'father' was supposed to act. He would never have been seen making a fool of himself (something I do often with my own children and grandchildren), nor would he ever have expressed any form of emotion.

Father was a traditional father; you always knew where you stood with him. 

So belatedly, I thank him for having given me a really great start in life; I suppose I should have said that when he was still alive, but it never crossed my mind.


9 comments:

  1. Well Cro he made you the man you are today, you broke the cycle and enjoy your children and grandchildren that's what counts.I would love to have happy memories of my father but it was not to be for me,my mother has been both Mother and Father to me and as she is still with me at 90 I imagine the gap she will leave in my life will be enormous.

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  2. Carole, you're very lucky to still have your mother. I lost both my parents when I was in my 30's.

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  3. Such a terse and lovely piece, I'm sure that would have impressed your father if he had heard or read it. Yes, it's a great pity he no longer lives to share your thoughts with you and glean from your own more mature knowledge. But you read to me in many ways similar to the one you describe in your own special grace, even though you play with your kids more than he had with his. As you imply, it also has to do with the times in which we live. Those WWII parents were tough nuts, mostly because they had to be to survive. BTW, your father is quite the handsome man in that photo you display. Cheers

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  4. Hello:
    Your father embodies the spirit of an age which, today, seems so very outdated and remote. But, it seems to us, that this situation could have been replicated in countless families throughout the country with attitudes which were instilled from Victorian parents before them.

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  5. We all have baggage. No doubt your dad had his fair share. Thank goodness you were able to forge ahead and not carry his burden.

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  6. Different times, different generations, different expectations of emotions. Fatherhood has evolved very much in the last 50 years and children are so much the better for it.

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  7. I do hope so SO. Although liberalism has its problems too.

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  8. My Dad died too ,over 20 years ago, It is a sad & strong loss.Yes,raise a glass to fathers everywhere.....

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  9. Happy Father's Day to you, Cro - hope you've had a great day today!

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