Wednesday, 4 November 2015

Work, spend, work, spend, work, spend.


                            Résultat de recherche d'images pour "buy more"

I was listening to a radio programme recently where someone described modern life as 'working eight hours a day (or more) in order to earn enough money to buy things you really don't need'. I think he had it just about right.

Of course, there are those who are working equally hard trying to sell us all those things we don't need. And loads of others who advertise the misconception that we all desperately do need what we don't need.

I have nothing against those who buy unnecessary trinkets; I myself buy antiques and paintings that often get put away in cupboards and forgotten. But too many people are out there working their butts off just to buy the latest watch, the latest car, or the latest pair of 'trainers'. Fashion victims. Madness.

So, are frugal people happier? Possibly not; but they may have more in the virtual bank than the excessive spenders. They certainly have more upstairs in their heads.




42 comments:

  1. I can't wait to read the comments today. Signed Spend Spend Spend.

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    1. Me too, Mia's already having a go at me.

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  2. Vivre et laissez vivre. You buy paintings or and antiques, they buy the latest Chanel watch . No difference.

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    1. The difference is that I only ever spend money I have. Many people buy with loans or credit cards, and struggle to pay for the rubbish they didn't really need in the first place.

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    2. You're right. I have no go on you. I just said people buy what they want and I really do not care. It's not my money. Your friend Rachel says fuck all the day and nobody cares. Vivre et laissez vivre.

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    3. That is why I wrote "I have nothing against those who buy unnecessary trinkets".

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  3. It's all a question of how much brain washing people are susceptible to. Some are just not able to resist the hard sell and seductive ads for the latest "trinkets".
    As we grow older, do we reach a point in life where we are no longer even aware of the latest fashions in "must haves"? We seem to have reached that stage long ago here !

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    1. Keeping up with the Jones's has never been part of my life; in fact there are very few Jones's here, up with whom I would need to keep.

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    2. In our last house we had Joneses living on either side of us, and neither were people we would have wanted to keep up with !

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  4. I also spend only money that i have. few minuts ago i ordered in Ebay Lego super heroes and Elsa dress for the comeing birthdays.

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    1. It's the best way, Yael. I feel very sorry for those who run-up huge debts.

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  5. If you watch certain Derren Brown programmes he will demonstrate just how easily we can be brainwashed and manipulated. I tell myself I can defend myself against advertising manipulation but I bet they get me sometimes.

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    1. I can't remember when I was last influenced by advertising; other than special offers on FOOD.

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  6. I am always buying trinkets and unnecessary junk, as you know. The reason for this is that it temporarily takes my mind off the painfully high cost of living (all the stuff we really need, like food and housing) that we are having to endure in Britain today.

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    1. Everywhere Tom; it's no different here.

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  7. Ah, but it's good for the economy.
    Just saw this quote passing on t'internet today. "Explain to future generations it was good for the economy, when they can't farm the land, breathe the air and drink the water."

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    1. Just wait till they do away with actual 'money'. That'll be fun.

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  8. As your last para included the word "frugal" I had to join in didn't I ?
    Being frugal (not mean) means that I CAN afford the odd trinket (mostly small antiques) and sea fishing trips and a drink of scotch when I fancy one.
    We have no debt, but when younger I remember maxing my credit card to £400 - a lot of money in those days. I eventually paid it off and then cut up the card. I still get hot just thinking of the worry.

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    1. And as I said, 'frugal' also means intelligent.

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  9. I buy very little these days Cro apart from clothes (which | still adore!) although I do buy work by local artists and craftsmen if it takes my fancy - I love to have these things around me.

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    1. The only thing I buy is food and wine. I think I have enough clothes to see me out.

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  10. I have a tendency towards frugality, long years being 'green' and making and growing things. As I have grown older the realisation that we are all dependent on each other factors in. The problem at the moment is that younger people are enticed in to buy, buy, buy, by the whole cornucopia of of goodies advertised everywhere....

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    1. Which is OK as long as they can afford it. Always remember Micawber.

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  11. We all have our weaknesses. My husband loves his good deals on fine wine and pretty shoes on sale are very tempting to me. We do not overspend and stay within budget, but there are things that tempt us that we don't need, but think we want. At this point in life though, who needs anything more to dust.

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    1. I was with a friend recently who bought a pair of red high heeled shoes, when I asked her when she intended to wear them she replied 'probably never'.

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  12. We have done a lot spending this year, most of it necessary, but I shall be glad when this patch of spending is done with and we can go back to quite a frugal way of life. In the past I found that the more I want and buy it is never enough to satisfy the hunger to have more. Now we are in France and living a different lifestyle it is a relief to have left that part of our lives behind.

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    1. We are less materialistic in France.

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    2. Oh no I lived in Paris and believe me they spend a lot of money for stupid things. French people need their Hermès foulard and Vuitton bag. Ir's just horriblr.

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    3. You are confusing the French with Parisians.... an entirely different thing.

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    4. I speak about French, go to Bordeaux, Lyon , Montpellier etc. Go to Versailles and you will see all the bourgeoisie in Burberreys ( do not even know how to write it) coats it's all the same, people in rural districts are for sure more authentic and represent what foreigners imagine about France.

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  13. Or as Wordsworth said:
    "The world is too much with us; late and soon,
    getting and spending we lay waste our powers.."

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  14. I think banks lend money to people who don't need it and they won't lend it to poor people who need it.

    I am like you Cro and collect lots of old and interesting things. I buy them from car boot sales. Wish I could paint.

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    1. My bank is always trying to lend me money I don't need. Of course, that's how they make their money.

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  15. If consumers stop buying crap they don't need, capitalism will crash and we'll all be in a deep depression/recession. I would love a Rolex and a stay at the new Ritz in Paris, but would never spend that kind of money. And, after moving my new mantra is if it has to be in a closet or stored away, you don't need it.

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    1. As long as things are bought with saved money and not borrowed, it's OK. Otherwise the whole world is buying stuff with someone else's money, and that can never be sustained.

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    2. Yes, you are right. I learned the credit lesson in my younger days and never buy anything on credit anymore. I don't even think they had credit cards when I was growing up. My housekeeper has 24 credit cards. Unbelievable. She uses them for stuff like new tires and car repairs. She'll never pay them off. Sad.

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    3. Unfortunately she's one of millions, and people wonder why the banks go bust!

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  16. Like Donna, I grew up in a pre-credit card era. One either used cash or wrote a check to pay for a purchase. I still sort of think in that budgetary way and never have to pay any interest on my credit cards.

    Makes life easier for me to keep it simple.

    Both this post and the earlier comments are particularly interesting to me, since I work in a fashion retail environment.

    Best wishes.

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    1. The majority use their credit cards as 'spend now, pay later' cards, and build up huge debts; often getting more cards, so that they can borrow more to pay off others. Nightmare.

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  17. In my opinion very VERY
    very frugal people are boring

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