Tuesday, 23 April 2013

La Boulangerie au Soleil d'Oc.




Typical of any small French village bakery, this is where I buy some of the best bread in the whole bloody world.

Up until about a year ago the shop's fa├žade was pleasantly old-fashioned, with an annoying metal-framed door that grated against the floor every time it was opened and closed. In their wisdom they have recently re-built the entire front, and it now looks like something from the 1950's.

The business end of the bakery is through that white door on the extreme right. 



And this is inside, with plenty of interesting breads on sale, plus a few tasty tarts (stop that sniggering!). Each week I invest in a couple of pukka country loaves, made as bread has always been made, with just flour yeast and water (and possibly a pinch of salt).



And here are the two still-warm loaves I brought home with me (you can also see them at the bottom of picture 2, as well as how much I paid for them); one will be started for lunch, the other popped into the freezer and taken out half-way through the week. Even looking at the picture makes me hungry.

Sometimes I wonder if I shouldn't have been a baker; I can picture myself in a village bakery (such as the one above), supplying the needs of a small population. But I'm sure I couldn't bake bread even half as good as this.
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18 comments:

  1. Oh my, freshly baked bread warm from the oven....with plenty of butter...ahem. (Wipes drool from chin.)

    Do my rapidly aging eyes deceive me, or are those Kinder Surprise chocolate eggs on the far left of picture 2? If so French children must be thought hardier than American children, because I believe they are deemed dangerous and banned in the USA. Funny old world, innit.

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  2. I had to giggle, if that were me, I know I'd be picking bits off along the road and on reaching home, be surprised to discover a wrapper full of crumbs in my arms LOL

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  3. What a strange shop front - but I don't suppose it matters when the bread is that good.

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    1. It has to be said that the French idea of 'design' is very different from the rest of the world. There is a beautiful old stone house very near to us that has recently been 'restored' by a French couple. It now has striped exterior awnings, 1950's doors, and a dreadful cheap modern roof. What a shame!

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  4. We tried this boulangerie on your recommendation Cro and I have to agree, the bread here is the best in the area. Lovely, friendly staff too.

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    1. It's all a matter of preference, and they certainly have mine. She's also to be found each Thursday evening at 'Lumberjack', which is handy.

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  5. Most of our grocery stores here put their bakery in the front of the store. There is nothing like the smell of fresh baked bread to make you hungry and buy more food.

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  6. It's not hard to make bread Cro..just time consuming. You would very soon develop 'the touch'.

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  7. Even with the fifties store front it still looks quintessentially French. Love it!

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  8. Oh for some real (not gluten free) bread.

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  9. When my grandmother baked bread and rolls, I swear we could pick up the scent a mile away. Butter with Mom's strawberry jam--oh, I wish had it all now.

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  10. Nothing like French bread. A place near me that made them almost as delicious has sadly gone out of business. Probably better for my waistline, but very sad for my tastebuds.

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  11. A loaf of bread and a jug of wine. And butter! Must have butter. (None of that fake margarine stuff.)

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  12. The French must make THE best bread in the world. I am very jealous!

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  13. a refreshing post on REAL GOOD bread. So simple, so delicious.

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