Thursday, 10 January 2013

The Terrace Wall, Jan 2013.



In some ways this is the garden's ideal season, as there is nowt to do other than rake a few leaves! There are no plants to tinker with, no grass to mow, and no anything. Just some old favourite objects to look at, and play with.



Many years ago, a friend decided he wanted to become a Blacksmith, and rather than go to Blacksmith University he just got on with it and made things. This candlestick, above, was a prototype for many he made later; it didn't go quite right (as you can probably see) which is why he gave it to me.



This strange piece of stone was found lying on the surface of a nearby cow field. I have no idea what it is, or how it came to have a hole in its middle. The stone contains thousands of tiny shells; not at all like our local stone! 



This may give the impression that Cro is a design conscious floozy, as these old French zinc watering cans are more often found in such places as S Ken' Mews gardens. In fact they are both still in regular use, and are NOT trendy fashion statements!


This gorgeous thing is a very old pinnacle. Probably from the top of a Pigeon Tower, it measures over 2 ft tall and is extremely decorative. I think the potter who made it must have enjoyed himself; either that, or he was on 'acid'.



And so to this. I have no idea what they are, but they are just about the only bit of colour in the garden at the moment; those pink and yellow berries look decidedly poisonous.

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22 comments:

  1. I really like the look of that pinnacle. This is the time of year to plan and dream about how you want to plant the next garden.

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  2. I wonder if that stone with the hole could be an extremely ancient and simple mill-stone which has been ploughed around a bit for many years? How big is it?

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    1. It's about a foot square. I did wonder if it could be post-hole support. I did once see something similar on Time Team where a holed stone had been half buried into the surface to support a much deeper post.

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    2. Yes - I too thought it could be some sort of hobble for an errant goat or whatever, but why such a large central hole, and why so neat? If it shows any sign of a smaller hole bored through (but not all the way through) toward the outer edge on the other side, then that would have been for the wooden handle to turn the stone against another stone, having poured the grain through the middle.

      Then again, it could be an early Henry Moore.

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  3. I thought it could be a millstone
    Or some sort of tether?

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    1. It's the stone itself which mystifies me; it's not at all like anything that grows here. A tether sounds a possibility.

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  4. I believe you re the watering cans Cro, as I have a couple as well. Still in constant use, and survivors of two house moves. They feel so much nicer to carry about than the green plastic one I also have!

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  5. It's a giant hagstone of course - you must have very big witches in that part of the world!

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    1. I do have some small hagstones, collected from Brighton beach.

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  6. Your garden accessories are interesting and lovely. I am curious about your plant. It looks to be some sort of ground cover; is that correct?

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    1. It's a bush; roundish and about 4ft tall.

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  7. Beautiful moss! Love the extra large "seeing stone" to see faeries....maybe it was meant for giants.

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  8. Maybe the rock is a rai stone (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rai_stones)

    They were (are?) used as a form of currency in some East Pacific islands.

    They have them on display at the Smithsonian Museum here in the States. Was just there this past Christmas, your picture made me think of them.

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    1. I've just looked up Rai stones. Very similar, but how would it have got to a field in rural France?

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  9. Love that stone with the hole....how I want to touch it.

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  10. When i looked at the plant, i first thought of bayberry or bog myrtle.

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  11. What a great post, so many interesting thins in your surroundings.;) I actually really like that candle holder that your friend made.;) The stone, might that be part of some equipment or tool? It reminds me of our (Danish crown), it is a coin with a hole in the middle.;)
    Happy New Year.;)
    xoxo

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  12. Looks like an ancient mill stone to me. The plant looks just like the Indian Hawthorn I have in my back garden.

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  13. All your wall ornaments look interesting.

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  14. I love the pinnacle too! Nice photos Cro.

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  15. oh I love this post...I want those accoutrements in your garden!!!...super

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